Postcard of USS Whipple (DD-15)

Postcard of USS Whipple (DD-15)


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

U.S. Destroyers: An Illustrated Design History, Norman Friedmann .The standard history of the development of American destroyers, from the earliest torpedo boat destroyers to the post-war fleet, and covering the massive classes of destroyers built for both World Wars. Gives the reader a good understanding of the debates that surrounded each class of destroyer and led to their individual features.


Postcard of USS Whipple (DD-15) - History

This page features pictures of USS Whipple (Torpedo Boat Destroyer # 15) in groups with other ships.

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Destroyers at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia , Autumn 1907

The destroyers in the foreground basin (from left to right):
USS Hull (Destroyer # 7)
USS Lawrence (Destroyer # 8)
USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6)
USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15) and
USS Truxtun (Destroyer # 14).
USS Stewart (Destroyer # 13) is at the end of the dock, at right, and USS Talbot (Torpedo Boat # 15) is hauled out on the marine railway at left.
On the opposite side of the river are several torpedo boats of the Reserve Torpedo Flotilla and their barracks ship, the old cruiser Atlanta .

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 102KB 740 x 600 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Destroyers at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia , Autumn 1907

These ships are (from left to right):
USS Hull (Destroyer # 7)
USS Lawrence (Destroyer # 8)
USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6)
USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15) and
USS Truxtun (Destroyer # 14).

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 73KB 740 x 595 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

At San Pedro, California, circa 1910-1914.
The original photograph was published on a color-tinted postcard by the M. Kashower Company, Los Angeles, California, at about the time it was taken.
These destroyers are (from left to right):
USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6)
USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15) and
USS Hull (Destroyer # 7).

Courtesy of R.D. Jeska, 1984.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 123KB 740 x 505 pixels

Moored together at San Diego, California, circa 1909-1911.
Photographed by the Arcade View Company, San Diego.
These ships are (from left to right):
USS Paul Jones or Perry (Destroyer # 10 or 11)
USS Preble (Destroyer # 12)
USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6)
USS Truxtun (Destroyer # 14)
USS Stewart (Destroyer # 13)
USS Lawrence (Destroyer # 8)
USS Hull (Destroyer # 7) and
USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15).
The numeral "2", painted on some of these destroyers, indicates they are members of the Second Torpedo Division.

Courtesy of Jack Howland, 1982.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 98KB 740 x 465 pixels

The Pacific Fleet's "Big Five" torpedo craft

At San Diego, California, prior to World War I.
These destroyers include (from left to right):
USS Preble (Destroyer # 12)
USS Perry (Destroyer # 11)
USS Hull (Destroyer # 7)
USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15) and
USS Stewart (Destroyer # 13).

Collection of Thomas P. Naughton, 1973.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 72KB 740 x 480 pixels

USS Stewart (Destroyer # 13) -- left center
and
USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15) -- right

At the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, circa 1912-1913.
The stern of USS Manila (1898-1913) is in the left foreground.
Note that Stewart flies a 48-star National Ensign, while Whipple has a 13-star "boat" flag.

Courtesy of Jack Howland, 1982.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 54KB 740 x 460 pixels

U.S. Navy destroyers of the First Division, Torpedo Flotilla, Pacific Fleet

At Long Beach, California, circa 1913-1916.
USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15) is in the middle.
The others are two of the following: USS Paul Jones (Destroyer # 10), USS Perry (Destroyer # 11) or USS Preble (Destroyer # 12).

Courtesy of Jack Howland, 1983.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 60KB 740 x 450 pixels

U.S. Pacific Fleet destroyers

At Mazatlan, Mexico, 26 April 1914, keeping watch on the Mexican gunboat Morales (the two-funneled ship in the right center distance).
The two destroyers nearest to the camera are (in no particular order):
USS Truxtun (Destroyer # 14) and
USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15).

Collection of Thomas P. Naughton, 1973.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 53KB 740 x 460 pixels

Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania

Destroyers awaiting decommissioning, in the Yard's Reserve Basin, 4 March 1919.
Ships present include (from left to right):
USS Lawrence (Destroyer # 8)
USS Perry (Destroyer # 11)
USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15)
USS Truxtun (Destroyer # 14) and
USS Worden (Destroyer # 16).
Note Lawrence 's after torpedo tube (with torpedo visible) and pattern camouflage 48-star flags, radio masts and signal flags on several of these destroyers and small craft moored to the ships' sterns.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 122KB 740 x 600 pixels

Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania

Destroyers awaiting decommissioning in the Navy Yard's Reserve Basin, during the Spring of 1919. Photographed by La Tour.
Ships present are identified in Photo # NH 43036 (complete caption).


Warship Wednesday, May 8, 2019: Vladivostok’s Red Pennant

Here at LSOZI, we are going to take off every Wednesday for a look at the old steam/diesel navies of the 1833-1946 time period and will profile a different ship each week. These ships have a life, a tale all their own, which sometimes takes them to the strangest places.- Christopher Eger

Warship Wednesday, May 8, 2019: Vladivostok’s Red Pennant

Here we see the Russian steam gunboat Adm. Zavoyko bobbing around in Shanghai harbor sometime in 1921, as you may observe from the local merchants plying their wares. When this photo was taken, she was perhaps the only seagoing member of a Russian fleet on the Pacific side of the globe. Funny story there.

Built at the Okhta shipyard in St. Petersburg for the Tsar’s government in 1910-11, she was named after the 19th century Imperial Russian Navy VADM Vasily Stepanovich Zavoyko, known for being the first Kamchatka governor and Port of Petropavlovsk commander, the latter of which he famously defended from a larger Anglo-French force during the Crimean War.

The riveted steel-hulled modified yacht with an ice-strengthened nose was some 142.7-feet long at the waterline and weighed in at just 700-tons, able to float in just 10 feet of calm water. Powered by a single fire tube boiler, her triple expansion steam engine could propel her at up to 11.5-knots while her schooner-style twin masts could carry an auxiliary sail rig. She was capable of a respectable 3,500 nm range if her bunkers were full of coal and she kept it under 8 knots.

Ostensibly operated by Kamchatka governor and intended for the needs of the local administration along Russia’s remote Siberian coast, carrying mail, passengers and supplies, the government-owned vessel was not meant to be a military ship– but did have weight and space reserved fore and aft for light mounts to turn her into something of an auxiliary cruiser in time of war (more on this later).

Sailing for the Far East in the summer of 1911, when war was declared in August 1914, the white-hulled steamer was transferred to the Siberian Flotilla (the largest Russian naval force in the Pacific after the crushing losses to the Japanese in 1905) and used as a dispatch ship for that fleet.

Now the Siberian Flotilla in 1914, under VADM Maximilian Fedorovich von Schulz– the commander of the cruiser Novik during the war with Japan– was tiny, with just the two cruisers Askold and Zhemchug (the latter of which was soon sunk by the German cruiser Emden) the auxiliary cruisers Orel and Manchu two dozen assorted destroyers/gunboats/minelayers of limited military value, seven cranky submarines and the icebreakers Taimyr and Vaigach. As many of these were soon transferred to the West and Arctic in 1915 once the Germans had been swept from the Pacific, our little steamer, armed with machine guns and a 40mm popgun, proved an increasingly important asset used to police territorial waters.

By 1917, with the Siberian Flotilla down to about half the size that it began the war with– and no ships larger than a destroyer– the 6,000 sailors and officers of the force were ripe for revolutionary agitation. As such, Adm. Zavoyko raised a red flag on her masts on 29 November while in Golden Horn Bay, the first such vessel in the Pacific to do so.

She kept her red pennant flying, even as Allies landed intervention forces at Vladivostok.

Japanese marines in a parade of Allied forces in Vladivostok before British, French and American sailors, 1918

As for the rest of the Siberian Flotilla, it largely went on blocks with its crews self-demobilizing and many jacks heading home in Europe. The fleet commander, Von Schulz, was cashiered and left for his home in the Baltics where he was killed on the sidelines of the Civil War in 1919.

By then, it could be argued that the 60 (elected) officers and men of the Adm. Zavoyko formed the only active Russian naval force of any sort in the Pacific.

In early April 1920, with the counter-revolutionary White Russian movement in their last gasps during the Civil War, the lukewarm-to- Moscow/Pro-Japanese Far Eastern Republic was formed with its capital in the Siberian port. It should be noted that the FER kind of wanted to just break away from the whole Russia thing and go its own way, much like the Baltics, Caucuses, Ukraine, Finland, and Poland had done already. Their much-divided 400

representative Constituent Assembly consisted of about a quarter Bolsheviks with sprinklings of every other political group in Russia including Social Revolutionaries, Cadets (which had long ago grown scarce in Russia proper), Mensheviks, Socialists, and Anarchists. This produced a weak buffer state between Soviet Russia and Imperial Japan.

The Far Eastern Republic ran from the Eastern shores of Lake Baikal to Vladivostok and only existed from 1920-23.

Now flying the (still-red) flag of the FER, Adm. Zavoyko was soon dispatched to bring a cache of arms to Red partisans operating against the last armed Whites on the coast of the Okhotsk and Bering Seas.

However, after Adm. Zavoyko left Vladivostok, the local demographics in its homeport changed dramatically. By early 1921, the population of the city had swelled to over 400,000 (up from the 97,000 who had lived there in 1916) as the White Army retreated east. With the blessing of the local Japanese forces– all the other Allies had left the city– the Whites took over the city in a coup on May 26 from the Reds of the Far Eastern Republic. As the Japanese were cool with that as well, it was a situation that was allowed to continue with the Whites in control of Vladivostok and the Reds in control of the rest of the FER, all with the same strings pulled by Tokyo. To consolidate their assets, the Whites ordered Adm. Zavoyko back to Vladivostok to have her crew and flags swapped out.

This put Adm. Zavoyko in the peculiar position of being the sole “navy” of an ostensibly revolutionary Red republic cut off from her country’s primary port. With that, she sailed for Shanghai, China and remained a fleet in being there for the rest of 1921 and into 1922, flying the St. Andrew Flag of the old Russian Navy. There, according to legend, she successfully fended off several plots from foreign actors, Whites, monarchists, and the like to take over the vessel.

By October 25, 1922, the Whites lost their Vladivostok privileges as the Japanese decided to quit their nearly five-year occupation of Eastern Siberia and the Amur region. White Russian RADM Georgii Karlovich Starck, who had held the rank of captain in the old Tsarist Navy and was the nephew of the VADM Starck who was caught napping by the Japanese at Port Arthur in 1904, then somehow managed to scrape together a motley force of 30 ships ranging from fishing smacks and coasters to harbor tugs and even a few of the old gunboats and destroyers of the Siberian Flotilla and sail for Korea with 10,000 White refugees aboard. His pitiful force eventually ended up in Shanghai on 5 December, where it landed its refuges, and then proceeded to sell its vessels (somewhat illegally) in the Philippines the next year, splitting the proceeds with said diaspora. Starck would later die in exile in Paris in 1950. His second in command, White RADM Vasily Viktorovich Bezoire (who in 1917 was only a lieutenant), remained in Shanghai and was later killed by the Japanese in 1941.

As for Adm. Zavoyko, once the FER voted to self-dissolve and become part of Soviet Russia, she lowered her St. Andrew’s flag, raised the Moscow flag, and sailed back home to the now-all-Soviet Vladivostok in March 1923 where became a unit of the Red Banner Fleet– the only one in the Pacific until 1932.

To commemorate her service during the Revolution and Civil War, her old imperialist name was changed to Krasny Vympel (Red Pennant). She was also up-armed, picking up four 75mm guns in shielded mounts, along with a gray scheme to replace her old white one.

For the next several years she was used to fight pockets of anarchists and White guards that persisted along the coast, engage stateless warlords, pirates, and gangs along the Amur, and shuffle government troops across the region as the sole Soviet naval asset in the area. She also helped recover former Russian naval vessels towed by the Japanese to Northern Sakhalin Island (where the Japanese remained in occupation until 1925).

In 1929, she stood to and supported the Northern Pacific leg of the Strana Sovetov (Land of the Soviets) seaplanes which flew from Moscow to New York. After that, with her neighborhood quieting down, she was used for training and coastal survey work but kept her guns installed– just in case.

Tupolev TB-1 Strana Sovyetov floatplane, 1929. The two planes would cover some 21,000 km to include a hop from Petrovavlask to Attu, which our vessel assisted with.

During WWII, with the revitalized Soviet Pacific Fleet much larger, Adm. Zavoyko/Krasny Vympel kept on in her role as an armed surveillance vessel and submarine tender, occasionally running across and destroying random mines sewn by Allied and Japanese alike.

In 1958, after six years of service to the Tsar, five years to various non-Soviet Reds, and 35 to the actual Soviets, she was retired but retained as a floating museum ship in her traditional home of Vladivostok in Golden Horn Bay.

Krasny Vympel 1973, via Fleetphoto.ru

Today, she remains a popular tourist attraction. She was extensively rebuilt in 2014 and, along with the Stalinets-class Red Banner Guards Submarine S-56 and several ashore exhibits, forms the Museum of Military Glory of the Pacific Fleet.

Krasny Vympel 75mm guns and Maxim, via Fleetphoto.ru

She has been the subject of much maritime art:

As well as the cover of calendars, postcards, pins, medals, and buttons.

You can find more photos of the vessel at Fleetphoto.ru (in Russian) and at the Vladivostok City site

Archive of the Modelist-Designer magazine, 1977, № 9 Via Hobby Port.ru http://www.hobbyport.ru/ships/krasny_vympel.htm

Displacement — 700 t
Length: 173.2 ft. overall (142.7 ft. waterline)
Beam: 27.88 ft.
Draft: 10 ft.
Engineering: 550 HP on one Triple expansion steam engine, one coal-fired boiler
Speed: 11.5 knots 3500 nm at 8
Crew: 60
Armament:
(1914)
1 x 40mm Vickers
2 x Maxim machine guns

(1923)
4 x 75-mm low-angle
1 x 40mm Vickers
2 x Maxim machine guns

If you liked this column, please consider joining the International Naval Research Organization (INRO), Publishers of Warship International

They are possibly one of the best sources of naval study, images, and fellowship you can find. http://www.warship.org/membership.htm

The International Naval Research Organization is a non-profit corporation dedicated to the encouragement of the study of naval vessels and their histories, principally in the era of iron and steel warships (about 1860 to date). Its purpose is to provide information and a means of contact for those interested in warships.

With more than 50 years of scholarship, Warship International, the written tome of the INRO has published hundreds of articles, most of which are unique in their sweep and subject.


Postcard of USS Whipple (DD-15) - History

  • Explore
    • Recent Photos
    • Trending
    • Events
    • The Commons
    • Flickr Galleries
    • World Map
    • Camera Finder
    • Flickr Blog
    • Prints & Wall Art
    • Photo Books

    You seem to be using an unsupported browser.
    Please update to get the most out of Flickr.

    Tags navalphilately
    View allAll Photos Tagged navalphilately

    USS BLACK HAWK (AD-9) was a U.S. Navy destroyer tender. At the time this envelope was canceled, she was serving in the Asiatic Fleet. Destroyer Tenders were repair ships, and were staffed with a skilled crew able to fix nearly anything. They tended not only destroyers, but any US Navy ship in need of repair or support.

    This is an envelope, made for collectors at the time, by Walter Crosby. He had the envelope commercially printed, and added the "real photo" before mailing it to the ship with a request for it to be postmarked. The ship's postal clerk would cancel the envelope, and mail it back to the collector.

    A good picture of BLACK HAWK pierside in Manila a year earlier, in 1937, is here: www.navsource.org/archives/09/03/09030925.jpg

    The Universal Ship Cancellation Society (USCS) is a philatelic organization promoting the study of the history of ships, their postal markings and postal documentation of events involving the U.S. Navy and other Navy and maritime organizations of the world.

    Collectors can be interested in the ship, its postmark, the cachet that occasionally appears on the envelope, special markings used by the ship or postal service, and, of course, the stamp.

    You can find the Society's webpage at www.uscs, and the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/groups/uscsnavalcovers/ . New members are welcomed from around the world and gain access to the Society’s award-winning monthly magazine, the USCS Log.

    This is one of the commemorative envelopes documenting the West Coast tour of the wooden sailing frigate USS CONSTITUTION in 1938.

    Launched in 1797, CONSTITUTION is most noted for her actions in combat during the War of 1812 against the United Kingdom, when she defeated five British warships. The battle with HMS GUERRIERE earned her the nickname of "Old Ironsides" and the public admiration that repeatedly saved her from being scrapped. CONSTITUTION was retired from active service in 1881, and in 1907 was designated a museum ship.

    Faced with scrapping in the 1930's, she was saved by the donations of pennies and dimes by millions of school children.

    In 1934, she completed a three-year, 90-port tour of the nation conducted as a way of expressing the thanks of the nation. That tour was commemorated via postal envelopes (covers) such as this one. The envelopes are popular with naval cover collectors, city and state collectors, stamp collectors, and cachet collectors.

    Constitution arrived at Port Townsend, Washington 26 July 1933 at 11:20 am from Anacortes, Washington, and departed 30 July 1933 at 6:58 pm for Portland, Oregon. The cachet for July 26 is known in red, blue, green, and the color shown in this scan, bi-color brown and green. These and some additional colors were used on other dates of the visit.

    A very close examination of the original scan shows that the cancellation date is 1933, despite it appearing at a glance as 1938.

    For additional background about CONSTITUTION's tour of our coasts, please see: ussconstitutionmuseum.org/collections-history/library-and.

    The Universal Ship Cancellation Society (USCS) is an international philatelic organization promoting the study of the history of ships, their postal markings and postal documentation of events involving the U.S. Navy, Coast Guard, Marine Corps and the maritime organizations of the world.

    You can find the Society's webpage at www.uscs, and their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/groups/uscsnavalcovers/ . We welcome new members from anywhere around the world!

    The USCS is offering a special one-year $10 new membership offer. New members from around the world will receive the monthly award winning 32-page USCS Log with great articles on naval/maritime history featuring covers & photos along with other benefits. www.uscs.org/join-uscs/

    This is a very sharp photo postcard of the Pacific Fleet flagship, the battleship USS PENNSYLVANIA (BB 38). A close study of the vessel, and the boats and aircraft alongside and aboard her while she was at anchor, is quite interesting.

    The card was postmarked aboard USS PENNSYLVANIA on June 24th, 1935. It is not clear to me where she was at the time of the postmark it's possible that she's at anchor off San Pedro CA research continues.

    From the DANFS history cited above: "On 6 August 1931, she again sailed for Guantanamo, and later continued on to San Pedro, where she again joined the Battle Fleet. From August 1931 to 1941, Pennsylvania engaged in Fleet tactics and battle practice along the west coast and participated in Fleet problems and maneuvers which were held periodically in the Hawaiian area as well as the Caribbean Sea."

    The Universal Ship Cancellation Society (USCS) is an international philatelic organization founded in 1932 promoting the study of the history of ships, their postal markings and postal documentation of events involving the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Merchant Marine, and other Navy and maritime organizations of the world.

    Collectors may be interested in the ship, its postmark, the cachet that occasionally appears on the envelope, special markings used by the ship or postal service, and, of course, the stamp. Collectors also focus on specific ports, countries, actions, types of ships, activities, special markings (such as censor's marks or air mail markings) and other information.

    The USCS is offering a special one-year $10 new membership offer. New members will receive the monthly award winning 32-page USCS Log with great articles on naval/maritime history featuring covers & photos along with other benefits. www.uscs.org/join-uscs/

    You can find the Society's webpage at www.uscs, and the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/groups/uscsnavalcovers/ . New members are welcomed from around the world and gain access to the Society’s award-winning monthly magazine, the USCS Log!

    USS WHIPPLE (DD 217) was a CLEMSON-class destroyer. These ships were colloquially known as "four stackers" due to their distinctive side profile.

    USS WHIPPLE's exciting 28-year naval career is outlined here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Whipple_(DD-217) . She packed a great deal of action into her years of service.

    At the time her mail clerk postmarked this envelope, made by collector E.A. Peake, WHIPPLE had been a member of the US Navy's Asiatic Fleet since 1929. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Asiatic_Fleet

    The stamp used on this envelope is the 3-cent United States 1934 Maryland Tercentenary stamp, showing the ships ARK and DOVE of 1634.

    The Universal Ship Cancellation Society (USCS) is an international philatelic organization founded in 1932. The Society promotes the study of the history of ships, their postal markings and postal documentation of events involving the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Merchant Marine, and other Navy and maritime organizations of the world.

    Society members are interested in the philatelic and cachet markings used by military and civilian ships alike.

    Collectors may be interested in the ship, its postmark, the unofficial cachet that occasionally appears on the envelope, special markings used by the ship or postal service, and, of course, the stamp. Collectors also focus on specific ports, countries, actions, types of ships, activities, special markings (such as censor's marks or air mail markings) and other information.

    You will find the Society's webpage at www.uscs.org, and the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/groups/uscsnavalcovers/ .

    The USCS is offering a special one-year $10 new membership offer. New members will receive the monthly award winning 32-page USCS Log with great articles on naval/maritime history featuring covers & photos along with other benefits. www.uscs.org/join-uscs/

    New members are welcomed from around the world and gain access to the Society’s award-winning monthly magazine, the USCS Log.

    This is an envelope made for the Universal Ship Cancellation Society to commemorate the relationship between the sister ships USS RODNEY M DAVIS and JDS YUUGIRI.

    USS RODNEY M DAVIS (FFG 60) was named for the Marine who earned the Medal of Honor in Vietnam when he unhesitatingly sacrificed himself to save his fellow Marines.

    The ship was the second-to-last in the OLIVER HAZARD PERRY class of guided missile frigates. RMD was commissioned in 1987 and decommissioned in 2015. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Rodney_M._Davis_(FFG-60) .

    At the time this envelope was mailed, RODNEY M DAVIS was a member of the Forward Deployed Naval Forces in Japan, and assigned to Destroyer Squadron 15, CTF 75 (Surface Combatant Force Seventh Fleet), and the US Seventh Fleet. The ship had just completed a short drydocking period in Yokosuka, Japan, and was conducting a training period at sea before returning to fleet operations.

    JDS YUUGIRI (DD 153) is a destroyer of the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force ASAGIRI class. She was commissioned in 1989. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asagiri-class_destroyer .

    The Universal Ship Cancellation Society (USCS) is a philatelic organization promoting the study of the history of ships, their postal markings and postal documentation of events involving the U.S. Navy and other Navy and maritime organizations of the world.

    Collectors may be interested in the ship, its postmark, the cachet (such as this one) that occasionally appears on the left side of the envelope, special markings used by the ship or postal service, and, of course, the stamp.

    You may find the Society's webpage at www.uscs, and the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/groups/uscsnavalcovers/ .

    The USCS is offering a special one-year $10 new membership offer. New members will receive the monthly award winning 32-page USCS Log with great articles on naval/maritime history featuring covers & photos along with other benefits. www.uscs.org/join-uscs/

    New members are welcomed from around the world and gain access to the Society’s award-winning monthly magazine, the USCS Log.

    This cover (envelope), cacheted aboard the U.S. Navy's first nuclear submarine, USS NAUTILUS (SSN 571) , was signed by her Commanding Officer, Commander Lando Zech USN, and canceled aboard the submarine tender USS FULTON.

    The envelope was sent through the U.S. mails to Captain Herbert Fox Rommel USN, then serving on the staff of the Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. Judging by the address handwriting, Captain Rommel probably addressed the envelope himself. Captain Rommel, a Pearl Harbor survivor, was a long-time member of the Universal Ship Cancellation Society who had served as the Society's president. He retired from active duty in 1969. www.herbrommel.com/

    Commander Zech commanded the submarine from June, 1959 to April, 1962. www.ussnautilus.org/nautilus/COOICs.shtml

    Vice Admiral Zech had an extraordinarily distinguished career.

    From his obituary, published in the Washington Post: "Former NRC Chairman Lando W. Zech, Jr., . a retired Navy Vice Admiral who later served as Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission died on Sunday, January 9, 2011. Admiral Zech, a resident of Falls Church, VA was born in Astoria, Oregon and spent his youth in Seattle, Washington, where he attended Roosevelt and Lakeside high schools. He was appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1941. At Annapolis, he played varsity baseball and basketball. In his senior year, he captained the baseball team. Admiral Zech served 39 years in the Navy after his graduation from the Naval Academy in 1944 with the World War II Class of 1945. His first assignment was to the destroyer USS JOHN D. HENLEY (DD 553) in the western Pacific where he participated in the second battle for the Philippines, the Iwo Jima and Okinawa campaigns and on picket station duty off the coast of Japan during the last days of the war. After the war and a second destroyer tour on the USS HENRY W. TUCKER (DD 875), Admiral Zech volunteered for submarine duty and subsequently commanded four submarines, USS SEA ROBIN (SS 407), USS ALBACORE (AGSS 569), and after nuclear power training, USS NAUTILUS (SSN 571) and USS JOHN ADAMS (SSBN 620). He later commanded the guided missile cruiser USS SPRINGFIELD (CLG 7). Upon his selection to flag rank, he served as Commandant of the Thirteenth Naval District in Seattle, WA, the Chief of Naval Technical Training in Memphis, TN and as Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Japan in Yokosuka. After his selection to Vice Admiral he served as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Manpower, Personnel and Training and Chief of Naval Personnel in Washington, D.C. He retired from the Navy in 1983. Admiral Zech graduated from the Armed Forces Staff College, the National War College and received a Masters Degree in International Affairs from George Washington University. In addition to campaign and foreign service medals he was awarded two Distinguished Service Medals, two Legions of Merit and the Navy Commendation Medal. On retiring from the Navy he was appointed a Commissioner and later Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission by President Ronald Reagan. During this 5 year appointment he visited all 110 nuclear powered plants in the United States and many plants overseas including Chernobyl after the accident in the then Soviet Union. After retiring from the NRC, he served on the Board of Directors of the Commonwealth Edison Company (now Exelon) for another 5 years and later as a Nuclear Safety consultant. Admiral Zech had been a resident of Falls Church since 1983. He was a parishioner of the Cathedral of Saint Thomas More in Arlington, VA, a supporter of the U.S. Naval Academy, the Archdiocese for the Military Services, U.S.A., the National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton and a member of the Army Navy Country Club. - See more at: www.legacy.com/obituaries/washingtonpost/obituary.aspx?pi. "

    The Universal Ship Cancellation Society (USCS) is a philatelic organization promoting the study of the history of ships, their postal markings and postal documentation of events involving the U.S. Navy and other Navy and maritime organizations of the world.

    You can find the Society's webpage at www.uscs, and their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/groups/uscsnavalcovers/ . We welcome new members from anywhere around the world!

    The USCS is offering a special one-year $10 new membership offer. New members from around the world will receive the monthly award winning 32-page USCS Log with great articles on naval/maritime history featuring covers & photos along with other benefits. www.uscs.org/join-uscs/

    This is the USS AMPHION information card. AMPHION was a repair ship that served in U.S. Navy. These kinds of cards were handed out at the quarterdeck to visitors as a way to advertise what the repair ship offered by way of services. As you can see, there was very little that a repair ship couldn't do!

    AMPHION was the first ship in this class of repair ships, the second ship in the U.S. Navy to bear the name, and was in commission from 1946 through late September, 1971, when she was decommissioned and transferred to Iran. Her entry in the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS) must have been made very early in her career. www.hazegray.org/danfs/auxil/ar13.htm , so I have included her Wikipedia page here for further details. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Amphion_(AR-13)

    In 1961, at the time this card was made, the ship was commanded by Captain Herb Rommel www.herbrommel.com/ Captain Rommel later served as President of the Universal Ship Cancellation Society (USCS), and was well-known as a dedicated naval officer and collector. He had a very interesting and active naval career which is outlined on this website: graemejwsmith.com/herb/navy.htm

    The Universal Ship Cancellation Society (USCS) is an international philatelic organization founded in 1932. The Society promotes the study of the history of ships, their postal markings and postal documentation of events involving the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Merchant Marine, and other Navy and maritime organizations of the world.

    Society members are interested in the philatelic and cachet markings used by military and civilian ships alike.

    Collectors may be interested in the ship, its postmark, the unofficial cachet that occasionally appears on the envelope, special markings used by the ship or postal service, and, of course, the stamp. Collectors also focus on specific ports, countries, actions, types of ships, activities, special markings (such as censor's marks or air mail markings) and other information.

    You will find the Society's webpage at www.uscs.org, and the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/groups/uscsnavalcovers/ .

    The USCS is offering a special one-year $10 new membership offer. New members will receive the monthly award winning 32-page USCS Log with great articles on naval/maritime history featuring covers & photos along with other benefits. www.uscs.org/join-uscs/

    New members are welcomed from around the world and gain access to the Society’s award-winning monthly magazine, the USCS Log.

    Technically speaking, this card is not philatelic in nature. That said, most collectors will amass collections of material related to their interests that help explain background not otherwise available to them. As it turns out, this card, printed aboard AMPHION, of course, was just the right size to be slipped into an envelope responding to a collectors request, and thus is clearly related to our collecting interests. (It also helps that I received this card from Captain Rommel himself during a visit to his retirement home in Newport RI).


    Whipple được đặt lườn vào ngày 12 tháng 6 năm 1919 tại xưởng tàu của hãng William Cramp and Sons ở Philadelphia. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 6 tháng 11 năm 1919, được đỡ đầu bởi bà Gladys V. Mulvey, một hậu duệ của Thiếu tướng Whipple và được đưa ra hoạt động vào ngày 23 tháng 4 năm 1920 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Đại úy Hải quân Richard F. Bernard.

    Giữa hai cuộc thế chiến Sửa đổi

    Sau khi hoàn tất chạy thử máy huấn luyện ngoài khơi vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba, Whipple quay trở về Philadelphia để sửa chữa sau thử máy. Nó khởi hành đi sang khu vực Cận Đông vào ngày 29 tháng 5 năm 1920, đi đến Constantinople, Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ vào ngày 13 tháng 6. Trong tám tháng tiếp theo, nó hoạt động tại khu vực Hắc Hải và Đông Địa Trung Hải dưới quyền chỉ huy chung của Đô đốc Mark L. Bristol, Tư lệnh Lực lượng Hải quân Hoa Kỳ tại vùng biển Cận Đông. Toàn bộ khu vực này vào lúc đó đầy những biến động và xáo trộn do sự kết thúc của Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ nhất. Nó đã chuyển thư tín cho tàu khu trục Chandler tại Samsun, Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ vào ngày 16 tháng 6, và đưa lên bờ các đại diện của công ty British American Tobacco mà nó đón lên tàu tại Constantinople. Sau đó nó viếng thăm Sevastopol ở Crimea thuộc Nga và Constanţa, Romania. Bất ngờ được lệnh đi đến Batum, Georgia, Whipple rời Samsun ngày 6 tháng 7 và di chuyển với tốc độ 30 kn (56 km/h) để đến nơi vào ngày hôm sau. Tại đây nó tham gia lễ khai sinh một cách hòa bình nước Cộng hòa Dân chủ Georgia, khi binh lính Anh và Pháp trao thành phố lại cho lực lượng Bạch vệ Nga.

    Sau đó Whipple hướng về phía Nam cho một chuyến đi ngắn dọc bờ biển, viếng thăm Beirut và Damascus, Syria cùng Port Said, Ai Cập trước khi quay trở về Constantinople vào ngày 18 tháng 8. Đang khi thực hiện chuyến đi này, Hải quân Mỹ áp dụng chính sách đặt số ký hiệu lườn tàu, và Whipple được xếp lại lớp với ký hiệu DD-217 vào ngày 17 tháng 7 năm 1920. Nó tiếp nối các hoạt động thường lệ tại Hắc Hải, vận chuyển thư tín và nhân sự đến các cảng và khảo sát tình hình tại các cảng Romania, Nga và phần châu Á Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ mà nó ghé thăm. Đang trên đường đi vào ngày 19 tháng 10, nó nhận được tín hiệu cầu cứu từ chiếc tàu hơi nước Hy Lạp Thetis, và đã lập tức đi đến trợ giúp con tàu bị mắc cạn ngoài khơi Constanţa. Sau mười giờ, chiếc tàu khu trục đã thành công trong việc giải cứu Thetis. Nó sau đó giúp đưa chiếc tàu hơi nước Mỹ SS Haddon bị hư hỏng quay trở lại Constantinople, và đang khi được tiếp nhiên liệu tại Constanţa, nó được tin tức về việc lực lượng Bolshevik Nga đang tiến sát đến Crimea, trong khi lực lượng Bạch vệ Nga dưới quyền tướng Pyotr Wrangel phải rút lui về Sevastopol.

    Whipple đi đến Sevastopol vào sáng ngày 14 tháng 11 để trình diện hoạt động cùng Phó đô đốc Newton A. McCully, khi mà hàng trăm xuồng đầy ắp lính Bạch vệ di tản có mặt trong cảng. Cùng với Whipple còn có tàu tuần dương St. Louis cùng các tàu khu trục OvertonHumphreys túc trực để di tản những người được lựa chọn mang giấy thông hành của đô đốc McCully. Trong suốt thời gian nó lưu lại Sevastopol, các khẩu pháo của Whipple luôn xoay về phía thành phố và luôn được túc trực, trong khi các xuồng đưa người tị nạn lên tàu và đội đổ bộ luôn sẵn sàng để được tung ra khi cần thiết. Khi chiếc xuồng cuối cùng rời bờ, lực lượng Bolshevik tiến đến quảng trường chính và bắt đầu bắn vào lực lượng Bạch vệ đang rút lui Whipple đã hoàn tất nhiệm vụ vừa kịp lúc. Sau đó nó kéo một xà lan chất đầy binh lính Bạch vệ bị thương ra khỏi tầm bắn của phe Bolshevik và chuyển gia việc kéo chiếc xà lan cho Humphreys. Là chiếc tàu Hoa Kỳ cuối cùng rời cảng, nó hướng đến Constantinople, hàng khách đầy cả trên boong lẫn dưới hầm tàu, không lương thực, nhiều người ốm và bị thương.

    Sau khi đưa những người tị nạn lên bờ tại Constantinople, Whipple tiếp tục nhiệm vụ tàu trạm và chuyển thư tín cùng Lực lượng Hải quân Hoa Kỳ Cận Đông, và thực hiện vai trò này cho đến cuối năm 1920 và đầu năm 1921. Vào ngày 2 tháng 5 năm 1921, cùng với các tàu khu trục cùng đội, nó lên đường đi sang Viễn Đông, băng qua kênh đào Suez, và ghé qua Bombay, Ấn Độ Colombo, Ceylon Batavia, Java Singapore và Sài Gòn, Đông Dương thuộc Pháp trên đường đi. Nó đi đến cảng nhà mới Cavite, Philippine, gần Manila, vào ngày 29 tháng 6. Trong bốn năm tiếp theo, nó phục vụ cùng Hạm đội Á Châu, biểu dương lực lượng và tuần tra sẵn sàng để bảo vệ tính mạng và tài sản của công dân Hoa Kỳ tại đất nước Trung Quốc đang trải qua nhiều cuộc biến động. Nó hoạt động ngoài khơi Cavite trong những tháng mùa Đông, tiến hành các cuộc thực tập chiến thuật, và tiến lên phía Bắc đến các cảng phía Bắc Trung Quốc trong mùa Xuân cho các hoạt động mùa Hè ngoài khơi Thanh Đảo.

    Xung đột giữa các lãnh chúa địa phương chung quanh Thượng Hải vào cuối năm 1924 và đầu năm 1925 đã khiến Whipple được huy động để phục vụ như một tàu vận chuyển. Vào ngày 15 tháng 1 năm 1925, phân đội Thủy quân Lục chiến trên chiếc pháo hạm Sacramento đã được cho đổ bộ lên bờ để bảo vệ tài sản của Hoa Kỳ trong khi cùng lúc đó một lực lượng viễn chinh Thủy quân Lục chiến dưới quyền chỉ huy của Đại tá James P. Schwerin được đón lên các tàu khu trục Whipple, BorieBarker. Họ được đổ bộ lên bờ vào ngày 22 tháng 1 để thay phiên cho phân đội chỉ có 28 người của Sacramento.

    Vào ngày 18 tháng 5 năm 1925, Whipple và đội của nó lên đường quay trở về Hoa Kỳ ngang qua Guam, Midway và Trân Châu Cảng, về đến San Diego vào ngày 17 tháng 6. Năm ngày sau, nó lên đường đi sang vùng bờ Đông Hoa Kỳ, đi đến Norfolk vào ngày 17 tháng 7. Sau đó nó hoạt động ngoài khơi vùng bờ Đông từ Maine đến Florida, cùng những chuyến đi đến vịnh Guantánamo để thực tập cơ động cùng hạm đội. Trong giai đoạn này, trong bốn lần khác nhau từ cuối năm 1926 đến đầu năm 1927, nó từng cho đổ bộ lực lượng lên bờ tại Nicaragua để bảo vệ tính mạng và tài sản của công dân Hoa Kỳ bị đe dọa bởi các vụ bạo động bất ổn tại đây.

    Whipple rời Norfolk vào ngày 26 tháng 5 năm 1927 để bắt đầu một chuyến đi cùng đội của nó đến các cảng Bắc Âu. Sau đó nó đi về phía Nam cho một lượt hoạt động ngắn tại Địa Trung Hải trước khi rời Gibraltar vào ngày 29 tháng 1 năm 1928 để hướng đến Cuba. Nó thực hiện các hoạt động tại vùng biển Caribe từ vịnh Guantánamo cho đến ngày 26 tháng 3 khi nó lên đường đi sang vùng bờ Tây. Nó hoạt động tại khu vực Thái Bình Dương từ căn cứ khu trục ở San Diego, California cho đến ngày 1 tháng 8 năm 1929, khi nó khởi hành rời vùng bờ Tây đi sang Viễn Đông cho lượt phục vụ thứ hai cùng Hạm Đội Á Châu.

    Whipple trải qua thập niên tiếp theo cùng Hạm đội Á Châu, quan sát diễn biến ngày càng căng thẳng do sự trỗi dậy của Nhật Bản tại Trung Quốc và vùng Viễn Đông nói chung. Nó tiếp nối nhịp điệu hoạt động trước đây cùng Hạm đội: tập trận mùa Đông tại vùng biển Philippine và cơ động mùa Hè ngoài khơi Thanh Đảo, Trung Quốc, cùng ghé thăm các cảng Trung Quốc dọc bờ biển trong các giai đoạn trung gian. Đang khi thực tập tại vịnh Subic vào mùa Xuân năm 1936, Whipple va chạm với tàu khu trục chị em Smith Thompson vào ngày 14 tháng 4. Chiếc tàu chị em bị hư hại nặng đến mức nó phải bị tháo dỡ mũi tàu của Whipple cũng hư hại nặng đến mức phải thay thế bằng mũi tài còn nguyên vẹn của Smith Thompson.

    Vào ngày 9 tháng 7 năm 1937, một hải đội nhỏ của Hạm đội Á Châu, bao gồm Whipple, Alden, BarkerPaul Jones, đã khởi hành từ Yên Đài vào ngày 24 tháng 7. Chúng gặp gỡ tàu tuần dương hạng nặng Augusta vào ngày 25 tháng 7 trên đường đi đến bờ biển phía Đông nước Nga, và đi đến Vladivostok, Liên Xô, vào ngày 28 tháng 7. Chuyến viếng thăm đầu tiên của các chiến hạm Hoa Kỳ lần đầu tiên kể từ khi thiết lập quan hệ ngoại giao với Liên Xô vào năm 1933 kéo dài cho đến ngày 1 tháng 8, khi các con tàu quay trở lại vùng biển Trung Quốc.

    Trong khi đó, quan hệ giữa Nhật Bản và Trung Quốc ngày càng xấu đi, đặc biệt là tại vùng Đông Bắc Trung Quốc. Sự phản kháng bị kềm chế trong một thời gian dài đã bộc lộ thành xung đột qua sự kiện Lư Câu Kiều gần Bắc Kinh vào ngày 7 tháng 7 năm 1937, nhanh chóng trở thành một cuộc chiến tranh tại vùng lân cận. Trên đường quay trở về sau chuyến viếng thăm Liên Xô, Whipple nhận được tin xung đột giữa Trung Quốc và Nhật Bản lại nổ ra tại Thượng Hải, đẩy cuộc Chiến tranh Trung-Nhật sang một giai đoạn ác liệt hơn. Hạm đội tiếp tục nhiệm vụ quan sát cuộc xung đột, sẵn sàng cho việc triệt thoái công dân Hoa Kỳ khỏi các cảng Trung Quốc trong trường hợp cần thiết. Đến giữa năm 1938, khi chiến tranh lan rộng vào đất liền và dọc lên theo sông Dương Tử, Hạm đội quay trở lại hoạt động thường lệ. Cùng với đội của nó và tàu tiếp liệu Black Hawk, Whipple đã viếng thăm Bangkok, Xiêm La, vào tháng 6 năm 1938.

    Trong diễn biến tiếp theo, Nhật Bản chiếm được hầu hết các thành phố và cảng quan trọng dọc bờ biển cũng như dọc theo hạ lưu sông Dương Tử, làm tăng mối nguy cơ đe dọa công dân nhiều nước phương Tây đang cố duy trì quyền lợi của họ tại Trung Quốc. Vào mùa Xuân năm 1939, một sự kiện như vậy diễn ra tại Hạ Môn, Trung Quốc, khi một tay súng Trung Quốc bắn vào một công dân Nhật Bản. Phía Nhật Bản phản ứng bằng cách cho đổ bộ Lực lượng Đổ bộ Đặc biệt Hải quân gần Tô giới quốc tế Cổ Lãng Tự Anh Quốc và Hoa Kỳ cũng hành động tương tự, cho thủy quân lục chiến đổ bộ từ các tàu tuần dương hạng nhẹ HMS Birmingham và USS Marblehead, tương ứng. Vào tháng 9 năm 1939, Whipple phục vụ như là một tàu trạm tại Hạ Môn, đội đổ bộ của nó được cho lên bờ, và Tư lệnh của Lực lượng Tuần tra Nam Trung Quốc, Đại tá Hải quân John T. G. Stapler, đã có mặt trên tàu.

    Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai nổ ra vào ngày 3 tháng 9 năm 1939 khi Pháp tuyên chiến với Đức. Các diễn tiến tiếp theo đã làm lệch cán cân quân sự tại Viễn Đông, khi Anh Quốc buộc phải cho rút hầu hết lực lượng Trạm Trung Quốc của họ để tăng cường cho Hạm đội Nhà và Hạm đội Địa Trung Hải. Whipple hoạt động Tuần tra Trung lập ngoài khơi Philippine cho đến năm 1941, khi Đô đốc Thomas C. Hart chuẩn bị cho Hạm đội Á Châu nhỏ bé của mình sẵn sàng cho chiến tranh.

    Thế Chiến II Sửa đổi

    1941 Sửa đổi

    Vào ngày 25 tháng 11 năm 1941, hai ngày trước khi có "cảnh báo chiến tranh" về một hành động thù địch có thể có từ phía Nhật Bản tại Thái Bình Dương trở nên rõ rệt – Đô đốc Hart cho tách Đội khu trục 58 của Whipple, cùng với Black Hawk, đi đến Balikpapan, Borneo, để phân tán lực lượng tàu nổi trong hạm đội của ông khỏi các vị trí mong manh trong phạm vi vịnh Manila. Tại đây, nó chờ đợi mệnh lệnh mới khi chiến tranh nổ ra vào ngày 8 tháng 12 năm 1941 (7 tháng 12 theo giờ địa phương phía Đông đường đổi ngày) khi Hải quân Đế quốc Nhật Bản bất ngờ tấn công Trân Châu Cảng. Nguyên được dự tính sẽ gia nhập Lực lượng Z của Hải quân Hoàng gia Anh hình thành chung quanh thiết giáp hạm HMS Prince of Wales và tàu chiến-tuần dương HMS Repulse, nhiệm vụ của Whipple bị hủy bỏ khi máy bay ném bom tầm cao và máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi của Nhật cất cánh từ Sài Gòn, Đông Dương thuộc Pháp đã đánh chìm cả hai chiếc tàu chiến chủ lực trên tại biển Hoa Nam ngoài khơi Kuantan, Malaya, vào ngày 10 tháng 12. Nó đi đến Singapore vào ngày 11 tháng 12, và lại khởi hành vào ngày 14 tháng 12, hướng sang Đông Ấn thuộc Hà Lan.

    1942 Sửa đổi

    Chiến đấu trong một cuộc chiến phòng thủ vô vọng trước một đối phương di chuyển linh hoạt và được tổ chức tốt, lực lượng của Bộ chỉ huy Mỹ-Anh-Hà Lan-Australia (ABDA) phải đối đầu với những trở ngại lớn khi rút lui về "Hàng rào Mã Lai". Vào lúc này, Whipple thực hiện nhiệm vụ tuần tra và hộ tống cho đến tháng 2 năm 1942. Vào ngày 12 tháng 2, nó khởi hành từ vịnh Prigi, Java trong hoàn cảnh sương mù dày đặc, để đi Tjilatjap thuộc bờ biển phía Nam của Java. Nó bị va chạm với chiếc tàu tuần dương hạng nhẹ HNLMS De Ruyter khi con tàu Hà Lan lù lù xuất hiện từ bóng đêm, Whipple đã bẻ hết lái sang mạn trái để né tránh, một hành động giúp nó tránh được hư hại nặng hơn. Vào ụ tàu tại Tjilatjap vào ngày 13 tháng 2, hư hại của nó được đánh giá là nhẹ, và nó tiếp tục hoạt động cùng hạm đội.

    Lúc 16 giờ 40 phút ngày 26 tháng 2, Whipple cùng tàu chị em Edsall khởi hành từ Tjilatjap để gặp gỡ chiếc tàu tiếp liệu thủy phi cơ Langley ngoài khơi bờ biển phía Nam Java. Gặp nhau lúc 06 giờ 29 phút sáng hôm sau, các tàu khu trục nhận vị trí hộ tống nhằm bảo vệ cho Langley, nguyên là tàu sân bay đầu tiên của Hải quân Hoa Kỳ, đang vận chuyển một lô máy bay tiêm kích nhằm tăng cường việc phòng thủ Java. Đến 11 giờ 50 phút, trinh sát viên phát hiện chín máy bay ném bom tầm cao đối phương tiếp cận từ phía Đông bốn phút sau một loạt bom nổ vây quanh Langley, rõ ràng là mục tiêu chú ý của quân Nhật. Trong một đợt tấn công thứ hai sau giữa trưa, cả ba con tàu dựng lên một màn hỏa lực phòng không dày đặc. Tuy nhiên, việc cơ động lẩn tránh của Langley không đủ để nó thoát khỏi tấn công đến 12 giờ 12 phút, sau khi trúng nhiều quả bom, chiếc tàu sân bay cũ bắt đầu bốc cháy.

    Whipple ngừng bắn lúc 12 giờ 24 phút khi những kẻ tấn công rút lui về phía Bắc. Nó đổi hướng và tiếp cận Langley để đánh giá thiệt hại của chiếc tàu tiếp liệu thủy phi cơ. Không lâu sau đó, bốn máy bay tiêm kích Nhật quần thảo bên trên các con tàu, một chiếc bị hư hại bởi hỏa lực phòng không. Langley bị bỏ lại lúc 13 giờ 25 phút, và Whipple tiến đến gần để cứu giúp những người sống sót, sử dụng hai chiếc bè cứu sinh của tàu khu trục, một số dây cáp và lưới treo bên mạn. Giữ ở khoảng cách 25 yd (23 m) từ con tàu đang chìm, nó vớt được khoảng 308 người là thành viên thủy thủ đoàn của Langley lẫn nhân sự Lục quân thuộc những máy bay Curtiss P-40 được chở trên sàn con tàu bị đắm. Đến 13 giờ 58 phút, công việc hoàn tất, và Whipple lùi ra xa để kết liễu Langley nhằm tránh khỏi rơi vào tay đối phương. Nó nổ súng lúc 14 giờ 29 phút, và sau 9 phát đạn pháo 4 inch cùng hai quả ngư lôi, Langley ngày càng ngập sâu hơn dưới nước nhưng chưa chìm hẳn. Tuy nhiên, mệnh lệnh đưa ra buộc WhippleEdsall phải rút lui trước khi có thể có các cuộc ném bom khác của đối phương.

    Whipple rút lui khỏi khu vực và hẹn gặp gỡ tàu chở dầu Pecos gần đảo Christmas để chuyển các phi công Lục quân sang chiếc tàu chở dầu. Lúc 10 giờ 20 phút ngày 27 tháng 2, ba máy bay ném bom hai động cơ Nhật Bản đã tấn công đảo Christmas, một chiếc phát hiện thấy Whipple và đã ném một loạt bom vốn không trúng vào chiếc tàu khu trục đang cơ động lẩn tránh nhanh nhẹn. Vào ngày 28 tháng 2, Whipple bắt đầu chuyển những người sống sót của Langley sang Pecos, hoàn tất nhiệm vụ lúc 08 giờ 00. Trong khi một tàu khu trục thực hiện chuyển người, chiếc kia tuần tra vòng quanh để chống tàu ngầm. Khi công việc hoàn tất, chúng tách ra khỏi chiếc tàu chở dầu, và đổi hướng do đoán trước một mệnh lệnh rút lui khỏi Java.

    Whipple chuẩn bị gửi một bức điện liên quan đến những mệnh lệnh này, khi sĩ quan truyền tin chính của tàu nhận được một lời kêu cứu qua vô tuyến từ Pecos vốn đang bị máy bay ném bom Nhật tấn công gần đảo Christmas. Whipple vội vã đi đến hiện trường để trợ giúp nếu có thể. Trong suốt buổi xế chiều, trong khi chiếc tàu khu trục tiếp cận chiếc tàu chở dầu, mọi người trên tàu chuẩn bị thắt nút dây và lưới hàng hóa sử dụng vào việc cứu vớt những người sống sót. Nó chuyển sang báo động trực chiến lúc 19 giờ 22 phút sau khi thấy nhiều đốm ánh sáng ở cả hai bên mũi tàu nó đi chậm lại và bắt đầu cứu vớt những người sống sót từ chiếc Pecos. Sau khi phải ngắt ngang việc cứu hộ để tấn công bất thành một tàu ngầm đối phương được cho là đang ở gần đó, nó quay trở lại nhiệm vụ cho đến khi nó vớt được tổng cộng 231 người từ chiếc tàu chở dầu. Whipple sau đó rời khu vực, tin rằng một tàu sân bay đối phương đang ở gần. Chỉ trong vòng vài ngày, Java rơi vào tay quân Nhật vốn đang dần dần củng cố vị thế của Khối Thịnh vượng chung Đại Đông Á. Whipple gia nhập phần còn lại của Hạm đội Á Châu tại vùng biển Australia.

    Đi đến Melbourne, Australia vào ngày 23 tháng 3, Whipple hoạt động cùng các tàu chiến của Hải quân Hoàng gia Australia và New Zealand trong các hoạt động hộ tống đoàn tàu vận tải dọc theo Rạn san hô Great Barrier cho đến ngày 2 tháng 5. Nó rời Sydney vào ngày hôm đó để hướng đi New Hebrides Islands, American Samoa và Hawaii, đi đến Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 6 tháng 6. Cùng với tàu chị em Alden, nó rời Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 8 tháng 6 để đi San Francisco, hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải hướng sang phía Đông để đi vùng bờ Tây, đến nơi vào ngày 18 tháng 6. Trong khi được đại tu và sửa chữa tại Xưởng hải quân Mare Island, trọng lượng nặng bên trên của chiếc tàu khu trục được ̣ cắt giảm khi các khẩu súng máy 20 mm phòng không được trang bị thay thế hai dàn ống phóng ngư lôi.

    1943 Sửa đổi

    Được cải biến cho công việc hộ tống vận tải, Whipple lại ra khơi, thực hiện lượt đầu tiên trong bảy chuyến đi khứ hồi hộ tống các đoàn tàu vận tải đi từ vùng bờ Tây đến khu vực Hawaii, vốn kéo dài cho đến mùa Xuân năm 1943. Rời vịnh San Francisco vào ngày 11 tháng 5 năm 1943, nó lên đường đi sang vùng biển Caribe cùng một đoàn tàu vận tải, băng qua kênh đào Panama để đi đến vịnh Santa Anna ở Curaçao, Tây Ấn thuộc Hà Lan. Sau khi các tàu hàng đã được chất dỡ, đoàn tàu tiếp tục đi, Cuba đi đến Căn cứ Hải quân vịnh Guantánamo vào ngày 29 tháng 5. Từ đây, nó hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải đi, rồi quay trở về căn cứ tại Cuba vào ngày 19 tháng 6 trước đi hướng lên phía Bắc, đi vào Xưởng hải quân New York để sửa chữa.

    Khởi hành từ New York vào ngày 10 tháng 7, Whipple hộ tống một nhóm tàu đi đến điểm gặp gỡ và gia nhập một đoàn tàu vận tải để hướng sang Casablanca, French Morocco và Gibraltar. Quay trở về Charleston, South Carolina vào ngày 27 tháng 8, chiếc tàu khu trục lại ra khơi vào ngày 7 tháng 9 trong thành phần một đoàn tàu kéo đi chậm, đi ngang qua vùng biển Caribe đến Recife, Brazil. Nó hướng lên phía Bắc không lâu sau đó, hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải đi Trinidad, rồi đi dọc bờ Đông để đến Charleston, đến nơi vào ngày 19 tháng 11. Sau một chuyến hộ tống vận tải khác từ Norfolk đến vịnh Guantánamo và vùng kênh đào Panama, nó tham gia cùng ba tàu khu trục khác vào đội đặc nhiệm chống tàu ngầm được hình thành chung quanh tàu sân bay hộ tống Guadalcanal (CVE-60).

    1944 Sửa đổi

    Khởi hành từ Norfolk vào ngày 5 tháng 1 năm 1944, đội đặc nhiệm tiến ra khơi để săn tìm tàu ngầm U-boat Đức Quốc xã hoạt động tại Đại Tây Dương. Vào ngày 16 tháng 1, máy bay của Guadalcanal phát hiện ba chiếc U-boat đang tiếp nhiên liệu trên mặt nước cách khoảng 300 dặm ngoài khơi Flores. Những chiếc máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi TBF Avenger cất cánh từ tàu sân bay đã tấn công, đánh chìm được U-544. Sau khi được tiếp nhiên liệu tại Casablanca, đội đặc nhiệm trở ra khơi, tiếp tục truy tìm tàu ngầm đối phương dọc các tuyến hàng hải, cho đến khi quay trở về Norfolk vào ngày 16 tháng 2. Được cho tách khỏi đội đặc nhiệm chống tàu ngầm không lâu sau đó, Whipple được sửa chữa tại Xưởng hải quân Boston.

    Vào ngày 13 tháng 3, Whipple rời vùng bờ Đông cùng với Đoàn tàu UGS-36 để hướng sang Địa Trung Hải. Vào sáng sớm ngày 1 tháng 4, máy bay ném bom Đức Dornier Do 217 và Junkers Ju 88 tiếp cận nhanh ở độ cao thấp tấn công vào đoàn tàu. Duy trì hỏa lực phòng không dày đặc bằng các khẩu đội 20 mm, nó thành công trong việc ngăn chặn khoảng 30 máy bay đối phương và giữ cho đoàn tàu vận tải không bị hư hại. Đi đến Bizerte, Tunisia vào ngày 3 tháng 4, chiếc tàu khu trục sau đó quay trở về Norfolk vào ngày 30 tháng 4.

    1945 Sửa đổi

    Trong thời gian còn lại của năm 1944 và mùa Xuân năm 1945, nó tiếp tục thực hiện nhiệm vụ hộ tống vận tải ngoài khơi bờ Đông, vượt Đại Tây Dương đến Casablanca, và thỉnh thoảng đi đến vùng biển Caribe.

    Đi đến New London, Connecticut vào ngày 6 tháng 6 năm 1945, Whipple được xếp lại lớp như một tàu phụ trợ với ký hiệu lườn AG-117. Sau khi hoạt động như một tàu mục tiêu để thực hành tàu ngầm ngoài khơi New London, nó đi vào Xưởng hải quân New York vào ngày 9 tháng 7 để cải tiến thành một tàu mục tiêu tốc độ cao. Vào ngày 5 tháng 8, nó rời New York để nhận nhiệm vụ tại khu vực Thái Bình Dương. Sau khi băng qua kênh đào Panama, nó đi ngang qua San Diego để hướng đến Hawaii, và đi đến Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 30 tháng 8. Con tàu đã phục vụ như tàu mục tiêu để huấn luyện tàu ngầm cho đến ngày 21 tháng 9.

    Không còn nhu cầu sử dụng khi chiến tranh kết thúc, Whipple rời Trân Châu Cảng để quay trở về vùng bờ Đông, đi đến Philadelphia vào ngày 18 tháng 10. Nó được cho xuất biên chế vào ngày 9 tháng 11 năm 1945 tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 5 tháng 12 và lườn tàu được bán cho hãng Northern Metals Company tại Philadelphia để tháo dỡ vào ngày 30 tháng 9 năm 1947.

    Whipple được tặng thưởng hai Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai.


    Contents

    After shakedown Hopkins arrived at Newport, Rhode Island, 31 May for battle practice training during the summer. In November, she was assigned to Destroyer Squadron 15 for tactical training with the Atlantic Fleet along the East Coast.

    Hopkins sailed from Hampton Roads 2 October 1922, and reached Constantinople 22 October for duty in Turkish waters. She protected American interests and cooperated with the relief mission in the Near East, ranging to Beirut, Jaffa, and Smyrna. She departed Constantinople 18 May 1923 for New York, arriving 12 June. For the next 7 years, Hopkins operated out of New England ports in the summer, Charleston, South Carolina, in the winter, and the Caribbean Sea in the spring. During the spring of 1930, Hopkins participated in force battle practice with aircraft.

    On 3 February 1932, Hopkins was one of the two naval ships rendering medical aid to earthquake victims at Santiago, Cuba. She departed 5 February to join the Pacific Fleet at San Diego, California. She had escort duty for President Franklin D. Roosevelt's cruise to Canada in July 1936, then resumed training along the Western Seaboard.

    Hopkins returned to Norfolk, Virginia in April 1939, and performed Neutrality Patrol from September 1939 until sailing for San Diego 37 May, and from there to Pearl Harbor. She converted to a high-speed minesweeper (DMS-13) in the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard.

    World War II [ edit | edit source ]

    When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, Hopkins was at Johnston Island for war maneuvers, but immediately headed back to Hawaii. She continued patrol of the Hawaiian Sea Frontier, with a short break for overhaul in the States, until late summer 1942, when she joined the invasion fleet bound for Guadalcanal. As America's first offensive of the Pacific war began 7 August, Hopkins swept the transport area and covered the landings on Tulagi. During a heavy enemy air attack 9 August, she shot down two enemy planes, and in the following months, Hopkins escorted transports, swept mines, and carried badly needed supplies to Guadalcanal.

    Hopkins served as flagship for Admiral Richmond K. "Kelly" Turner as the Russell Islands were invaded 21 February 1943. During the action, she shot down a Japanese plane. Remaining in the southwest Pacific, she joined in the initial invasion of Rice Anchorage, New Georgia, 4 July, and of Bougainville 1 November. Convoy escort, antisubmarine patrol, and sweeping duties kept the destroyer busy until the Solomon Islands were secured.

    As the Navy moved farther across the Pacific in the island-hopping campaign, Hopkins arrived off Saipan 13 June 1944 to sweep the invasion approaches. She provided screen and fire support for the amphibious landings of 15 June 1944. She picked up 62 prisoners from sunken Japanese ships as well as rescuing a downed fighter pilot and a seaplane crew. A brief rest at Eniwetok was followed by a role in the capture of Guam. Hopkins reached that important Marianas island 14 July to participate in the preinvasion sweeping and bombardment. She also gave fire-support to the landings 16 July.

    Following overhaul at San Francisco, CA, Hopkins arrived in Leyte Gulf 27 December 1944 to prepare for the Lingayen landings. The minesweepers sailed 2 January 1945 to sweep Lingayen Gulf under attack from Japanese dive bombers and kamikazes. When her sister ship Palmer was hit and sank in 13 minutes the morning of 7 January, Hopkins rescued 94 survivors.

    Hopkins departed the Philippines 15 January 1945 for a brief rest at Eniwetok, then swept the transport areas and channels off Iwo Jima to prepare for invasion 19 February 1945. She remained on patrol off Iwo Jima, emerging from heavy air and shore fire unscathed. Departing Iwo Jima 6 March, Hopkins next headed into battle off Okinawa, the "last stepping stone to Japan." While fighting off the constant raids and suicide attacks she shot down several Japanese planes. On 4 May 1945 she was struck a glancing blow by a burning kamikaze just before it plunged into the sea. There was one casualty during this attack. Coxswain Morris Dee Garrett was the only casualty on that day and was the only casualty from the USS Hopkins during World War II.

    On 7 June 1945, Hopkins steamed for overhaul at Leyte, Philippine Islands where she remained until cessation of hostilities. Hopkins then rendezvoused with units of the 3rd Fleet headed for Tokyo Bay. After two days of sweeping the entrances to Tokyo Bay, Hopkins anchored in sight of Mount Fuji 30 August 1945. Hopkins rode out two typhoons with winds raging to 125 knots before her departure from Tokyo Bay 10 October 1945 for the Eastern Seaboard of the United States.

    Hopkins arrived in Norfolk 28 November and decommissioned there 21 December 1945. She was sold for scrapping 8 November 1946 to Heglo Sales Corporation, Hillsdale, New Jersey.


    U.S.S. EDSON

    The USS EDSON (DD-946), the thirteenth "Big Gun" Forrest Sherman class destroyer, was commissioned on 7 NOV 1958. Built at Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine, USS EDSON conducted her shakedown training in the Caribbean, transited the Panama Canal and called on Lima, Peru before reaching her homeport of Long Beach, California. USS EDSON began a series of Western Pacific deployments, five of which took her in to the Vietnamese war zone. In 1967 EDSON was hit by North Vietnamese shore artillery. After the war USS EDSON continued the West Coast "DD" routine of "West Pacs" alternating with state side maintenance and training. USS EDSON served her country for 30 years, 1 month and 8 days, until decommissioned on 15 DEC 1988. After decommissioning USS EDSON was donated to the INTREPID Sea-Air-Space Museum at New York City and was berthed there until 2004. The hulk of the EDSON is laid up at NISMF - Philadelphia, PA.

    The USS EDSON (DD-946) deployment history and significant events of her service career follow:


    Postcard of USS Whipple (DD-15) - History

    A Blue Sea of Blood, Deciphering the Mysterious Fate of the USS Edsall by Don M. Kehn.

    Edsall sailed from Philadelphia 6 December 1920 for San Diego on shakedown. She arrived at San Diego 11 January 1921 and remained on the west coast until December, engaging in battle practice and gunnery drills with fleet units. Returning to Charleston, S.C., 28 December, Edsall was ordered to the Mediterranean and departed 26 May 1922.

    Arriving at Constantinople 28 June, Edsall joined the U.S. Naval Detachment in Turkish Waters to protect American lives and interests. The Near East was in turmoil with civil strife in Russia and Greece at war with Turkey.

    She did much for international relations by helping nations to alleviate postwar famine in eastern Europe, evacuating refugees, furnishing a center of communications for the Near East, and all the while standing by for emergencies. When the Turks set fire to Smyrna (Izmir), Edsall was one of the American destroyers that evacuated several thousand Greeks. On 14 September 1922 she took 607 refugees off Litchfield (DD-336) in Smyrna and transported them to Salonika, returning to Smyrna 16 September to act as flagship for the naval forces there. In October she carried refugees from Smyrna to Mytilene on Lesvosis. She made repeated visits to ports in Turkey, Bulgaria, Russia, Greece, Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Tunisia, Dalmatia, and Italy, yet managed to keep up gunnery and torpedo practice with her sisters until her return to Boston for overhaul 26 July 1924.

    Edsall sailed for the Asiatic Station 3 January 1925, joining in battle practice and maneuvers at Guantánamo Bay, San Diego, and Pearl Harbor before arriving Shanghai, 22 June. She was to become a fixture of the Asiatic Fleet on the China coast, in the Philippines and Japan. Her primary duty was protection of American interests in the Far East, expanding constantly since acquisition of the Philippines. She was faithful guardian through civil war in China, and the Sino-Japanese War. Battle practice, maneuvers and diplomacy took her most frequently to Shanghai, Chefoo, Hankow, Hong Kong, Nanking, Kobe, Bangkok, and Manila.

    When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941 Edsall readied for action with DesDiv 57 at the southeast Borneo oil port of Balikpapan. She raced to Singapore, embarked a British liaison officer and four men to search for survivors of HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse, sunk off Malaya the 10th. She intercepted a Japanese fishing trawler with four small boats in tow and escorted them into Singapore. She joined Houston (CA-30) at Surabaya to escort shipping retiring to the relative safety of Darwin, Australia. While so serving, she became the first U.S. destroyer to sink a full-sized enemy submarine in World War II. With three Australian corvettes, Edsall sent I-124 to the bottom on 20 January 1942 off Darwin.

    Continuing to escort convoys in a race against time, Edsall was damaged when one of her own depth charges exploded prematurely during an antisubmarine attack 19 February 1942. She gamely continued to operate off Java, then on 26 February steamed from Tjilatjap to rendezvous with Langley (AV-3). The 27th, the seaplane tender and escorts Edsall and Whipple (DD-217) were attacked by nine large twin-engine bombers which damaged the historic Langley so badly she had to be abandoned. Edsall picked up 177 survivors, Whipple 308. On the 28th the two destroyers rendezvoused with Pecos (AO-6) off Flying Fish Cove, Christmas Island. More Japanese bombers forced Edsall to leave before transferring all Langley men, but she completed the job on 1 March then headed back to Tjilatjap. She never arrived. The gallant old four-piper fought a hopeless action against Japanese battleships Hiei and Kirishima, who sank her on the afternoon of 1 March 1942.


    USS Elliot (DD-967)

    Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 05/02/2019 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

    The USS Elliot was one of the 31 Spruance-class destroyers (no longer in service with the United States Navy - USN). One of her final support operations involved action in Operation Enduring Freedom. After some 30-plus years of active service, the vessel was relegated to target duty and was sunk off of the coast of Australia in joint operation exercises to which she would become an artificial reef for the local environment. A conventional naval vessel operated by up to 334 personnel, the USS Elliot set out in 1977, was later fitted with her Sea Sparrow missile capabilities, and then reported for service in 1978. Her voyages took her primarily around the Pacific Ocean serving in fleet and deployed multiple times.

    Power was derived from her four General Electric GE LM2500 gas turbines feeding twin shafts at 80,000 shaft horsepower providing up to 32 knots. Armament for the type initially revolved around her 2 x 5" Mark 45 dual-purpose main guns (one forward and one aft). This would shortly be supplemented by the addition of her NATO Sea Sparrow missile launchers. Additional offensive firepower was supplied by 2 x 324mm torpedo launchers, Harpoon anti-ship missile launchers and Phalanx CIWS systems, the latter around her primary superstructure. Her profile was characterized by her twin main masts amidships. A helicopter pad at near-stern served the 2 x Sikorsky-type SH-60 Seahawk LAMPS III helicopters.

    The USS Elliot was ordered in 1971, laid down in 1973 and launched in 1974, being officially commissioned in 1977. She was named after Lieutenant Commander Arthur Elliot II whom lost his life while serving in the United States Navy as a commander in the Patrol Boat River Squadron 57 in the Vietnam War.


    After Action Reports

    Unfortunately, although some After Action Reports from the Korean War are available online (including a collection available to view and download from archive.org), the actual After Action Report covering this incident doesn't appear to be among them (yet).

    This may well be part of the collection 'Reports and Other Records Relating to Korean War Military Operations, 1950 - 1956' held by the US National Archives. This collection is described as follows:

    "This series consists of reports and other records relating to U.S. Navy and Marine Corps operations during the Korean War. Included are final reports on U.S. Pacific Fleet operations, and on the First Marine Division operation at Chosin Reservoir. After action reports on other operations, and many maps and map overlays are included. There are national intelligence surveys on Korea, and transcripts of interviews with Marine officers about their combat experiences. Illustrated pamphlets on major lessons of the Korean War, and published historical studies on U.S. Air Force operations in the war are also included. At the end of the series is an Army War College conference report on United Nations military operations in Korea to the end of 1951, and First Marine Division general orders designating combat units in Korea for 1953. The records were maintained by the History and Museums Division and its predecessor."

    Since the Hampton Roads Naval Museum also maintains an extensive collection of material relating to the USS Wisconsin (as it says on their website), they may well also have copies of the reports there (in addition to records of the recollections of men who served on her during the Korean War).


    Watch the video: Postcard of Sandhja Finland


Comments:

  1. Fektilar

    It is the good idea.

  2. Kejinn

    It is a pity, that now I can not express - there is no free time. I will return - I will necessarily express the opinion.

  3. Eder

    Bravo, your thought is brilliant

  4. Lafayette

    It agree, a remarkable phrase

  5. Nikojas

    And where logic?

  6. Mazubei

    Just think!



Write a message