Floyd B. Parks DD- 884 - History

Floyd B. Parks DD- 884 - History


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Floyd B. Parks DD- 884

Floyd B. Parks

Floyd Bruce Parks, born 16 January 1911 in Salisbury, Mo., was a member of the Naval Academy class of 1934, and was appointed a Second Lieutenant in the Marine Corps 1 June 1934. He commanded Marine Fighting Squadron 221 in the Battle of Midway, in which he was killed, 4 June 1942, while leading his men against a vastly superior force of Japanese bombers and fighters. For his heroism, Major Parks was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross.

(DD-884: dp. 2,425; 1. 390'6"; b. 41'1"; dr. 18'6"; s. 36 k.; cpl. 367; a. 6 5", 6 21" tt., 6 dcp., 2 dct., cl. Gearing)

Floyd B. Parks (DD-884) was launched 31 March 1945 by Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Tex.; sponsored by Mrs. Floyd B. Parks, widow of Major Parks; and commissioned 31 July 1945, Commander M. Slayton in command.

Floyd B. Parks arrived at San Diego, her home port, 16 November 1945, and sailed 20 November for her first tour of duty in the Far East, patrolling the coast of China and operating in the Marianas until her returned, to San Diego 11 February 1947. In the period prior to the outbreak of war in Korea, Floyd B. Parks twice more deployed to the Far East for duty with the 7th Fleet, returning from her second such cruise 13 June 1950, just before the North Koreans crossed the 38th parallel. At once she prepared to return to duty as a standby at Pearl Harbor, available should war spread, returning to San Diego 20 August.

Floyd B. Parks sailed from San Diego 19 February 1961 to join in United Nations operations in Korea. On 16 March she joined the fast carrier task force, screening them during air operations off the east coast as well as spending a total of 60 days in Wonsan Harbor on blockade and bombardment duty. She returned to San Diego 10 October 1951, and after west coast operations, sailed for duty in the Far East again 31 May 1953 Along with duty similar to that of her first war cruise, she patrolled in the South China Sea and the Taiwan Strait. She returned to San Diego 18 December 1952, and began a peace-time schedule of annual Far East cruises interspersed with west coast training operations and necessary maintenance.

During her 1955 Far Eastern cruise, Floyd B. Parks took part in evacuation of the Tachen Islands, and while in the Orient once more 11 March 1956, collided with Columbus (CA-74), losing 2 men and a 40-foot section of her bow. Skillful work by her crew saved their ship, and brought her safely into Subic Bay for temporary repairs. Upon her return to Long Beach Naval Shipyard 14 May 1966, Floyd B. Parks' damaged bow was replaced with that of the uncompleted destroyer Lansdale (DD-766) and after completion of repairs and installation of new equipment Floyd B. Parks returned to her west coast-Far East rotation through 1962.


USS Floyd B. Parks (DD-884)

USS Floyd B. Parks (DD-884), named for Major Floyd B. Parks USMC (1911�), was a Gearing-class destroyer laid down by the Consolidated Steel Corporation at Orange, Texas on 30 October 1944, launched on 31 March 1945 by Mrs. Floyd B. Parks, widow of Major Parks and commissioned on 31 July 1945.

Floyd B. Parks arrived at San Diego, her home port, 16 November 1945, and sailed 20 November for her first tour of duty in the Far East, patrolling the coast of China and operating in the Marianas Islands until her return to San Diego 11 February 1947. In the period prior to the outbreak of war in Korea, Floyd B. Parks twice more deployed to the Far East for duty with the US 7th Fleet, returning from her second such cruise 13 June 1950, just before the North Koreans crossed the 38th parallel. At once she prepared to return to duty as a standby at Pearl Harbor, available should war spread, returning to San Diego 20 August.

Floyd B. Parks sailed from San Diego 19 February 1951 to join in United Nations operations in Korea. On 16 March she joined the fast carrier task force, screening them during air operations off the east coast as well as spending a total of 60 days in Wonsan Harbor on blockade and bombardment duty. She returned to San Diego 10 October 1951, and after west coast operations, sailed for duty in the Far East again 31 May 1952. Along with duty similar to that of her first war cruise, she patrolled in the South China Sea and the Taiwan Strait.

Kawishiwi (AO-146) refueling Floyd B. Parks and Orleck (DD-886) in the late 1950s.

During her 1955 Far Eastern cruise, Floyd B. Parks took part in evacuation of the Tachen Islands, and while in the Orient once more 11 March 1956, collided with USS Columbus (CA-74), losing 2 men and a 40-foot (12 m) section of her bow. Skillful work by her crew saved their ship, and brought her safely into Subic Bay for temporary repairs. Upon her return to Long Beach Naval Shipyard 14 May 1956, Floyd B. Parks' damaged bow was replaced with that of the uncompleted destroyer USS Lansdale (DD-766) and after completion of repairs and installation of new equipment Floyd B. Parks returned to her west coast-Far East rotation through 1962.

Floyd B. Parks operated with the Seventh Fleet in support of United Nations Forces during the Korean War.

During the Vietnam War, Floyd B. Parks served as plane guard for aircraft carriers on Yankee Station in the Tonkin Gulf, participated in Operation Sea Dragon, patrolled on search and rescue duties, and carried out naval gunfire support missions.

Floyd B. Parks was decommissioned on 2 July 1973, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 2 July 1973, and sold for scrapping on 29 April 1974.


FLOYD B PARKS DD 884

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Gearing Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid 30 October 1944 - Launched 31 March 1945

Naval Covers

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Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


USS Floyd B. Parks (DD-884)

USS Floyd B. Parks (DD-884), named for Major Floyd B. Parks USMC (1911–1942), was a Gearing-class destroyer laid down by the Consolidated Steel Corporation at Orange, Texas on 30 October 1944, launched on 31 March 1945 by Mrs. Floyd B. Parks, widow of Major Parks and commissioned on 31 July 1945.

Floyd B. Parks arrived at San Diego, her home port, 16 November 1945, and sailed 20 November for her first tour of duty in the Far East, patrolling the coast of China and operating in the Marianas Islands until her return to San Diego 11 February 1947. In the period prior to the outbreak of war in Korea, Floyd B. Parks twice more deployed to the Far East for duty with the US 7th Fleet, returning from her second such cruise 13 June 1950, just before the North Koreans crossed the 38th parallel. At once she prepared to return to duty as a standby at Pearl Harbor, available should war spread, returning to San Diego 20 August.

Floyd B. Parks sailed from San Diego 19 February 1951 to join in United Nations operations in Korea. On 16 March she joined the fast carrier task force, screening them during air operations off the east coast as well as spending a total of 60 days in Wonsan Harbor on blockade and bombardment duty. She returned to San Diego 10 October 1951, and after west coast operations, sailed for duty in the Far East again 31 May 1952. Along with duty similar to that of her first war cruise, she patrolled in the South China Sea and the Taiwan Strait.

During her 1955 Far Eastern cruise, Floyd B. Parks took part in evacuation of the Tachen Islands, and while in the Orient once more 11 March 1956, collided with USS Columbus (CA-74), losing 2 men and a 40-foot (12 m) section of her bow. Skillful work by her crew saved their ship, and brought her safely into Subic Bay for temporary repairs. Upon her return to Long Beach Naval Shipyard 14 May 1956, Floyd B. Parks' damaged bow was replaced with that of the uncompleted destroyer USS Lansdale (DD-766) and after completion of repairs and installation of new equipment Floyd B. Parks returned to her west coast-Far East rotation through 1962.

Floyd B. Parks operated with the Seventh Fleet in support of United Nations Forces during the Korean War.

During the Vietnam War, Floyd B. Parks served as plane guard for aircraft carriers on Yankee Station in the Tonkin Gulf, participated in Operation Sea Dragon, patrolled on search and rescue duties, and carried out naval gunfire support missions.

Floyd B. Parks was decommissioned on 2 July 1973, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 2 July 1973, and sold for scrapping on 29 April 1974.


USS Floyd B. Parks (DD-884), 1945-1974

USS Floyd B. Parks, a 2425-ton Gearing class destroyer built at Orange, Texas, was commissioned in July 1945. Assigned to the Pacific Fleet, in early 1946 she steamed to the Far East on the first of twenty Western Pacific deployments she would make over the next twenty-seven years. During the Korean War, Floyd B. Parks twice participated in combat support operations, including an intense shore bombardment effort during 1951 in which she fired over twelve-thousand five-inch shells.

During the rest of the 1950s and early 1960s, Floyd B. Parks continued her pattern of regular WESTPAC deployments. In January 1955, she assisted with the evacuation of the Tachen Islands, near the China coast. She was damaged in a collision in March 1956, but returned to active service by mid-Summer. During the later 1950s, she supported nuclear tests in the Central Pacific. In 1962-63 the middle-aged destroyer was given an extensive "FRAM-I" modernization to better equip her for contemporary anti-submarine warfare.

As U.S. participation in the Vietnam conflict expanded during the middle and later 1960s, Floyd B. Parks was regularly stationed in that area. She actively carried out shore bombardment missions during deployments in 1968, 1969, 1971 and 1972. USS Floyd B. Parks decommissioned in July 1973 and was sold for scrapping in April 1974.

USS Floyd B. Parks was named in honor of Major Floyd B. Parks, USMC, who was killed in action during the Battle of Midway.

On a day like today. 1864: At Petersburg, Union General Ulysses S. Grant realizes the town can no longer be taken by assault and settles into a siege.


USS Floyd B. Parks (DD-884)

USS Floyd B. Parks (DD-884), named for Major Floyd B. Parks USMC (1911–1942), was a Gearing-class destroyer laid down by the Consolidated Steel Corporation at Orange, Texas on 30 October 1944, launched on 31 March 1945 by Mrs. Floyd B. Parks, widow of Major Parks and commissioned on 31 July 1945.

Floyd B. Parks arrived at San Diego, her home port, 16 November 1945, and sailed 20 November for her first tour of duty in the Far East, patrolling the coast of China and operating in the Marianas Islands until her return to San Diego 11 February 1947. In the period prior to the outbreak of war in Korea, Floyd B. Parks twice more deployed to the Far East for duty with the US 7th Fleet, returning from her second such cruise 13 June 1950, just before the North Koreans crossed the 38th parallel. At once she prepared to return to duty as a standby at Pearl Harbor, available should war spread, returning to San Diego 20 August.

Floyd B. Parks sailed from San Diego 19 February 1951 to join in United Nations operations in Korea. On 16 March she joined the fast carrier task force, screening them during air operations off the east coast as well as spending a total of 60 days in Wonsan Harbor on blockade and bombardment duty. She returned to San Diego 10 October 1951, and after west coast operations, sailed for duty in the Far East again 31 May 1952. Along with duty similar to that of her first war cruise, she patrolled in the South China Sea and the Taiwan Strait.

During her 1955 Far Eastern cruise, Floyd B. Parks took part in evacuation of the Tachen Islands, and while in the Orient once more 11 March 1956, collided with USS Columbus (CA-74), losing 2 men and a section of her bow. Skillful work by her crew saved their ship, and brought her safely into Subic Bay for temporary repairs. Upon her return to Long Beach Naval Shipyard 14 May 1956, Floyd B. Parks' damaged bow was replaced with that of the uncompleted destroyer USS Lansdale (DD-766) and after completion of repairs and installation of new equipment Floyd B. Parks returned to her west coast-Far East rotation through 1962.

Floyd B. Parks operated with the Seventh Fleet in support of United Nations Forces during the Korean War.

During the Vietnam War, Floyd B. Parks served as plane guard for aircraft carriers on Yankee Station in the Tonkin Gulf, participated in Operation Sea Dragon, patrolled on search and rescue duties, and carried out naval gunfire support missions.

Floyd B. Parks was decommissioned on 2 July 1973, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 2 July 1973, and sold for scrapping on 29 April 1974.


Biography

Parks was born in Salisbury, Missouri, the first child of James B. Parks and his wife Elizabeth Ann Bowman. James Parks was a widower with one son from his first marriage. Floyd Parks also had a younger brother, Billy Bowman Parks, born in 1921. Their father died on 3 February 1924.

Floyd Parks enlisted in the United States Navy in 1928 and served two years aboard destroyers. In 1930, he received an appointment to the United States Naval Academy. Parks earned the infamous Black "N" award, given for major infractions, on a number of occasions. He sang in the Midshipman Choir and was a member of Annapolis' water polo team, also participating in football and swimming. Parks graduated in the upper third of his class of 1934, and chose a commission in United States Marine Corps. He was appointed a second lieutenant on June 1 and assigned to the Philadelphia Navy Yard for a year, before serving on the cruiser USS Astoria (CA-34). In May 1936, he reported to Naval Air Station Pensacola for flight training. While swimming in the Gulf of Mexico, Parks and an enlisted man rescued a Marine private from drowning, winning commendation for his "quick action, good judgment and swimming ability".

Parks was designated a Naval Aviator on 12 June 1937, and in August reported to Naval Air Station San Diego, California. The following year, he married Margaret Elizabeth Murray of El Paso, Texas. In June 1940, he was reassigned to NAS Pensacola as a flight instructor. In May 1941, he transferred to the First Marine Aircraft Wing, Fleet Marine Force, Quantico, Virginia, and trained as a dive bomber pilot. He remained in that assignment until March 1942, when he joined the Second Marine Aircraft Wing in San Diego for deployment to Midway.

He was promoted to the rank of major on 8 May 1942, and given command of Marine Fighting Squadron 221 (VMF-221). Parks' squadron was predominantly equipped with Brewster F2A-3 (Model B-439) fighter aircraft, supplemented by a handful of Grumman F4F-3 Wildcats, all handed down from U.S. Navy squadrons. More than half of the aviators assigned to Parks' unit were fresh from flight training in San Diego.


Parks was born in Salisbury, Missouri, the first child of James B. Parks and his wife Elizabeth Ann Bowman. James Parks was a widower with one son from his first marriage. Floyd Parks also had a younger brother, Billy Bowman Parks, born in 1921. Their father died on 3 February 1924, leaving their mother a widow. Floyd Parks enlisted in the United States Navy in 1928 and served two years aboard destroyers. In 1930 he received an appointment to the United States Naval Academy. Parks earned the infamous Black "N" award, given for major infractions, on a number of occasions. He sang in the Midshipman Choir and was a member of Annapolis' water polo team, also participating in football and swimming. Parks graduated in the upper third of his class of 1934, and chose a commission in United States Marine Corps. He was appointed a Second Lieutenant on June 1 and assigned to the Philadelphia Navy Yard for a year, before serving on the cruiser USS Astoria (CA-34). In May 1936 he reported to the Naval Air Station Pensacola for flight training. While swimming in the Gulf of Mexico, Parks and an enlisted man, rescued a Marine private from drowning, winning commendation for his "quick action, good judgment and swimming ability".

Parks was designated a Naval Aviator on 12 June 1937, and in August reported to Naval Air Station San Diego, California. The following year he married Margaret Elizabeth Murray of El Paso, Texas. In June 1940 he was reassigned to the NAS Pensacola as a flight instructor. In May 1941, he transferred to the First Marine Aircraft Wing, Fleet Marine Force, Quantico, Virginia, and trained as a dive bomber pilot. He remained in that assignment until March 1942, when he joined the Second Marine Aircraft Wing in San Diego, for deployment to Midway. His wife, Margaret, returned to El Paso to stay with her mother during his deployment.

He was promoted to the rank of Major on 8 May 1942, and given command of Marine Fighting Squadron Two Twenty One (VMF-221) during the Battle of Midway. Park's squadron was predominantly equipped with Brewster F2A-3 (Model B-439) fighter aircraft, supplemented by a handful of Grumman F4F-3 Wildcats, all handed down from U.S. Navy squadrons. More than half of the aviators assigned to Parks' unit were fresh from flight training in San Diego. During the battle of Midway, Parks was killed in action on the first day of the battle on June 4, 1942, while leading his squadron against a superior force of Japanese fighters and bombers attacking the island. For his heroism, Major Parks was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. The citation reads as follows:

"For extraordinary heroism and conspicuous devotion to duty as Squadron Commander for Marine Fighting Squadron TWO TWENTY-ONE, in action against enemy Japanese forces during the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. Leading his squadron in a dauntless and aggressive attack against a vastly superior number of Japanese bomber and fighter planes, Major Parks aided in disruption the plans of the enemy and lessening the effectiveness of their attack, thereby contributing materially to the success of our forces. As a result of his courageous and daring tactics and because of the circumstances attendant upon this engagement, there can be little doubt that Major Parks gallantly gave up his life in the service of his country. He displayed the characteristics of a fine leader and excellent airman in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."


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Product Description

USS Floyd B Parks DD 884

1949 - 1950 Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history. (Most Sailors consider the cruise book one of their most valued treasures)

You would be purchasing the USS Floyd B Parks DD 884 cruise book during the Korean War era. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Cruise History
  • Christening and Launching the Ship
  • Cruise Chart
  • Crossing the Equator Ceremony
  • The Ester Incident
  • Crew Roster
  • Plus Much more

Over 39 photos and the ships story told on 33 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.

Additional Bonus:

  • Several Additional Images of the USS Floyd B Parks DD 884 (National Archives)
  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
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    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
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    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
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    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

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    Floyd B. Parks DD- 884 - History

    (DD-884: dp. 2,425 l. 390'6" b. 41'1" dr. 18'6" s. 36 k. cpl. 367 a. 6 5", 6 21" tt., 6 dcp., 2 dct., cl. Gearing)

    Floyd B. Parks (DD-884) was launched 31 March 1945 by Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Tex. sponsored by Mrs. Floyd B. Parks, widow of Major Parks and commissioned 31 July 1945, Commander M. Slayton in command.

    Floyd B. Parks arrived at San Diego, her home port, 16 November 1945, and sailed 20 November for her first tour of duty in the Far East, patrolling the coast of China and operating in the Marianas until her return, to San Diego 11 February 1947. In the period prior to the outbreak of war in Korea, Floyd B. Parks twice more deployed to the Far East for duty with the 7th Fleet, returning from her second such cruise 13 June 1950, just before the North Koreans crossed the 38th parallel. At once she prepared to return to duty as a standby at Pearl Harbor, available should war spread, returning to San Diego 20 August.

    Floyd B. Parks sailed from San Diego 19 February 1961 to join in United Nations operations in Korea. On 16 March she joined the fast carrier task force, screening them during air operations off the east coast as well as spending a total of 60 days in Wonsan Harbor on blockade and bombardment duty. She returned to San Diego 10 October 1951, and after west coast operations, sailed for duty in the Far East again 31 May 1953 Along with duty similar to that of her first war cruise, she patrolled in the South China Sea and the Taiwan Strait. She returned to San Diego 18 December 1952, and began a peace-time schedule of annual Far East cruises interspersed with west coast training operations and necessary maintenance.

    During her 1955 Far Eastern cruise, Floyd B. Parks took part in evacuation of the Tachen Islands, and while in the Orient once more 11 March 1956, collided with Columbus (CA-74), losing 2 men and a 40-foot section of her bow. Skillful work by her crew saved their ship, and brought her safely into Subic Bay for temporary repairs. Upon her return to Long Beach Naval Shipyard 14 May 1966, Floyd B. Parks damaged bow was replaced with that of the uncompleted destroyer Lansdale (DD-766) and after completion of repairs and installation of new equipment Floyd B. Parks returned to her west coast-Far East rotation through 1962.


    Watch the video: Mother - The Floyd Concept


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