Meteor Sets World Speed Record - History

Meteor Sets World Speed Record - History


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(9/7/46) The Meteor, Britain's jet fighter, attained a speed of 611 mph, setting a new world speed record.

Black Watch

Original caption, ca. 1951, Utah, USA — On the Measured 13 Mile Straight-a-way Course, Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah. Roland R. Free, Making a New American Motor-Cycle Record. Roland R. Free, of Los Angeles, Calif., riding a British-Vincent Motor-Cycle in a prone position to cut down wind resistance approximately 2 miles, on Sept. 11, 1950, established a new American speed record for 1 mile @ 156.71 miles per hour. Mr. Free’s picture was taken from an automobile running parallel to the black line while traveling in excess of 100 M.P.H. just before the auto reached the measured 1 mile zone of the 13 mile straight-a-way course, Mr. Free caught up with the automobile and immediately after his picture was taken, he gave his Motor-Cycle the gun the photographers say it seemed like they were still, the way he left them with his sudden burst of speed. — Image by © Lake County Museum

Original caption, ca. 1951, Utah, USA — Mormon Meteor. The World’s Greatest Unlimited Speed Record Maker, Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah. The Days Run Completed. Holding All Speed Records from 10 Miles to 7,134 and from One Hour to 48 Hours. Mormon Meteor: David Abbott (Ab) Jenkins. Owner-Driver, and founder of the Salt Flats as a race course. Utah born and reared 1883. Religion, (Mormon). Holder of more world’s unlimited records than any man in history of sports. The only man who has ever driven an automobile continuously without relief for 24 hours, under supervision of contest board. Awarded champion of champions plaque and cup for the world’s safest driver. In 1950 at age 67, he made his fastest lap of 13 miles @ 199.19 M.P. H. Raced his last time in July, 1951. Now retired. He attributes his stamina to the fact, he never in his life, tasted liquor or tobacco. Average M.P.H, Distance: 199.19, 10 Miles — Image by © Lake County Museum

Original caption, ca. 1938, Utah, USA — The Bonneville Salt Flats is a salt deposit left by the receding of ancient Lake Bonneville. This deposit covers about 159 square miles extending some nine miles along U.S. Highways 40 and 50 and the Western Pacific Railroad. The salt is white, crystalline aggregate, porous, hard and rigid so that it supports loaded trucks. In 1912 this area was tested as a race track and has since proved to be the greatest automobile speedway in the world. In 1931 Ab Jenkins of Salt Lake City broke all former world speed records. Here on September 15, 1938, John Cobb established a record of 350.07 miles per hour. The next day Captain G.E.T. Eyston set a world’s record of 357.50 miles per hour. Aug. 26, 1939, John Cobb again became the world’s automobile speed king by driving his car 369.74 miles per hour. — Image by © Lake County Museum

FASTEST SPEEDWAY-NEAR GREAT SALE LAKE, UTAH. SIR MALCOLM CAMPBELL IN THE “BLUEBIRD” DOING OVER 301 MILES PER HOUR. The Bonneville Salt Flats is a salt deposit left by the receding of ancient Lake Bonneville which at one time covered about 20,000 sq. miles. This Salt Deposit covers about 159 sq. miles that extend about 9 miles along Western Pacific R. R. Salduro Station lies at about the center. The Salt is a white coarsely crystalline aggregate and is porous. Though the Pore Space is entirely filled with a saturated brine, the material is hard and rigid so that it supports loaded trucks. In 1912 the Bonneville Salt Flats was tested as a race course and declared the greatest speedway in the world. In 1931 Ab Jenkins of Salt Lake City broke all speed records. Since then most of the world’s famous drivers have had their try on this — Image by © Lake County Museum/CORBIS


'Mormon Meteor' Wins Best of Show

On Sunday August 19 under pristinely sunny skies above California&rsquos picturesque Monterey Peninsula, the 1935 Duesenberg SJ Special owned by Harry Yeaggy of Cincinnati, Ohio, took Best of Show honors at the 2007 Pebble Beach Concours d&rsquo Elegance, the annual vintage car show and competition now in its 57th year.

Also known as the &ldquoMormon Meteor,&rdquo Yeaggy&rsquos winning car is a supercharged Duesenberg once owned by colorful former Salt Lake City Mayor Ab Jenkins, who not only set speed records with the car but also drove it on the streets of the city.

Finished in bright yellow with large chrome lettering on the engine cover, the flamboyant Mormon Meteor caught the attention of the Pebble Beach Concours judges, who chose the SJ Special over all other automotive class winners of the day.

In 1935 the car made national headlines when it set a speed record, traveling for 24 hours at an average speed of 135.58 mph. It was more recently the focus of the automotive world when it sold at the 2004 Pebble Beach Auction conducted by Gooding & Company for a record $4.45 million.

"I'm trying to catch my breath," said Yeaggy on late Sunday afternoon while he stood atop the winner's ramp that the cars cross so owners can collect their trophies. "I knew I had a great car. I love the styling and the art deco look. . . . It's just elegant from every different direction. . . . In my opinion, this is the most significant American car ever built.&rdquo


Gloster Meteor during the Second World War

The Gloster Meteor I was the only Allied jet aircraft to see combat during the Second World War. It made its operational debut at almost exactly the same time as the German Me 262, but while the Me 262 saw action against Allied aircraft over Germany, the Meteor began its service career against the V-1 Flying Bomb, and despite the best efforts of its pilots never had the chance to prove itself against the Luftwaffe.

After a long development process the Meteor F Mk.I was finally ready to enter begin service testing in June 1944. In May a dedicated flight, the T-Flight, was set up at the A&AEE at Farnborough, under the command of Group Captain Hugh Joseph Wilson, receiving its first aircraft in the next month. Over the next month they were subjected to tests, and on 17 July 1944 the Meteor was cleared for service use at a maximum weight of 11,925lb, although its speed was limited to 400mph at altitudes below 15,000ft, or to 450mph below 8,000ft in calm air. One week later, on 23 July 1944, T-Flight, with its aircraft and pilots flew to Manston to join No.616 Squadron, the first squadron to receive the Meteor.

No.616 Squadron had received its first aircraft on 12 July 1944 at Culmhead in Somerset. It then moved to Manston, where its pilots gained experience with the new jet. By the end of the first week more than thirty of the squadron&rsquos pilots had converted to the new jet fighter.

At this point the RAF was not willing to deploy the Meteor over occupied Europe, feeling that the Meteor I was not sufficiently impressive to risk against the Luftwaffe. Instead it was decided to use the high low altitude speed of the Meteor against the V-1 Flying Bomb. The first interception was made on 27 July 1944, when Squadron Leader Watts caught up with a V-1 over Ashford, but on this occasion his cannon jammed.

The squadron&rsquos first success came on 4 August 1944. This time the Meteors were operating in pairs, in case of further problems with the cannon, but once again the cannons failed. The first interception was made by Pilot Officer Dean. After his cannon failed, he used the &ldquotip and run&rdquo tactic to destroy the V-1. This involved bringing the wingtip of the Meteor close to the wingtip of the V-1. Air pressure then knocked the V-1 off course which disrupted the gyroscope based auto pilot, sending the V-1 crashing to the ground. A few minutes later Flying Officer Roger destroyed a second V-1, this time with his fully functioning cannons. The Meteors of No.616 squadron eventually claimed thirteen V-1s.

The threat of the Me 262 worried the USAAF, so for a week from 10 October 1944 a series of exercises were carried out in which a flight of Meteors from No.616 squadron made mock attacks on a formation of 100 B-24s and B-17s guarded by 40 Mustangs and Thunderbolts. These suggested if the jet fighter attacked the formation from above it could take advantage of its superior speed in the dive to attack the bombers and then escape by diving through the formation before the escorts could react. The best counter was to place a fighter screen 5,000ft above the bombers and attempt to intercept the jets early in the dive.

With the arrival of the Meteor F Mk.III in December 1944 the RAF finally decided that the Meteor was ready for combat over Europe. On 20 January 1945 a flight of four Meteors moved to Melsbrook in Belgium becoming the first Allied jet squadron to operate from the continent. Their initial purpose was to provide air defence for the airfield, but it was also hoped that their presence might provoke the Germans into sending Me 262s against them. At this point the Meteor pilots were still forbidden to fly over German occupied territory, or to go east of Eindhoven, to prevent a downed aircraft being captured by the Germans or the Soviets.

In March 1944 the entire squadron moved to Gilze-Rijen in Holland, and on 13 April moved again to Nijmegen. Finally, on 17 April the Meteor entered combat over Europe, carrying out a ground attack mission near Ijmuiden. For the rest of the war the squadron flew a mix of ground attack and armed reconnaissance missions.

The biggest frustration for the pilots of 616 Squadron was that they never clashed with the Me 262, or indeed with any German fighter aircraft. They came close towards the end of the war when a flight of Meteors encountered a force of Fw 190s, but they were forced to abandon their attack when other RAF fighters mistook them for Me 262s. The nearest No.616 squadron came to a jet-to-jet battle came on 19 March, when a force of Arado Ar-234 jet bombers attacked their airfield.

Comparison with the Me 262

The Gloster Meteor entered service just after the Messerschmitt Me 262. In July 1944 the experimental unit Erprobungskommando 262 (Test Command 262) began to fly experimental interceptions of high flying Allied reconnaissance aircraft. On 25 July one of their Me 262s clashed with a RAF Mosquito, which escaped, allowing its crew to report their first encounter with a German jet. The first operational sortie of the Gloster Meteor came two days later, on 27 July.

The Gloster Meteor can claim to be the first jet fighter to enter operational service, while No.616 squadron of the RAF was the first operational jet fighter in the work. The first fully operational Me 262 squadron, Kommando Nowotny, was not formed until September 1944, under the command of the famous ace Walter Nowotny, flying its first operation on 3 October.

The Me 262 was a more capable aircraft than the wartime versions of the Meteor. Its top speed of 540mph was 50mphs faster than even the Derwent IV equipped version of the Meteor III. However by the end of the war the Meteor IV was almost ready, and had the speed to match the German jet. On the plus side the Meteor was much more reliable than the Me 262, which suffered from famously unreliable engines.

Gloster Meteor, Britain's Celebrated First-Generation Jet, Phil Butler and Tony Buttler. This is a detailed, well illustrated and well written look at the development and service history of the Gloster Meteor, both in British and overseas hands. The book covers the development of the E.28/39, Britain's first jet aircraft and the development of the Meteor, looks in detail at the prototype aircraft, the various versions of the Meteor and its British and overseas service careers. [see more]

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The Fastest Jet Flight in History

Eldon Joersz wasn’t originally interested in flying the SR-71 Blackbird.  He was a fighter pilot—he’d flown the F-105 over Vietnam and Laos—and he knew that the sleek spy plane wasn’t about pulling Gs so much as flying high and very fast.

But Joersz applied to pilot the SR-71 anyway, and so it happened that he was in the cockpit on July 28, 1976, when the Blackbird set a world air speed record: 2,193 miles per hour (Mach 3.3) on a straight-line course over Edwards Air Force Base in California. Forty years later, the record still stands—the fastest flight ever for a piloted jet.

Joersz, a retired Air Force Major General, explains in a recent 40 th anniversary interview with the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (the body that keeps official aviation records) how the record was actually set twice.  He and reconnaissance systems officer George Morgan flew the same course at the same speed on July 27, but because there was a cloud cover that day, they couldn’t verify the 80,000-foot altitude. So, for the benefit of the FAI observers, they flew the same route again on the 28 th , and that’s the official date in the record books.

Timed for the 1976 U.S. bicentennial, the Edwards flight was part of a deliberate attempt to capture three speed records, and it was all very methodical and planned, recalls Joersz. The SR-71 normally flew at Mach 3.2, so it wasn’t even much of a stretch in terms of speed. “That’s where we flew the SR-71 all the time. It wasn’t difficult, but it was precise, it demanded your attention and it demanded smoothness,” he told the FAI interviewer. “For us at the time, it was just a fun thing to do. It was not Earth-shattering.”

The record-setting Blackbird is now on display at the Museum of Aviation at Robins AFB in Georgia.

This Lockheed Martin video gives a little more background on Eldon “Al” Joersz and his historic flight:


Meteor World Speed Record Weekend

Sixty years ago this September, Group Captain E.M. (Teddy) Donaldson of the RAF’s High Speed Flight took off from Tangmere and flew Meteor F4 EE549 along a monitored course off the Sussex coast to claim a new world airspeed record of 616 mph. This actual aircraft is on display in the Merston Hall at the Museum.

To commemorate this tremendous British achievement the Museum is holding its own Meteor World Speed Record weekend on September 2nd and 3rd. As well as the Museum’s Honorary President, Neville Duke, we are expecting a number of aviation personalities to be present. And we are hoping to welcome as many Meteor pilots as possible, so if you flew any mark of Meteor at any time in your career please come and join us on either of the days. It would be most helpful if you could contact us beforehand at [email protected] so that we can prepare your special guest badge.

Everyone is welcome to Meteor World Speed Record event, and we are arranging side shows, childrens’ rides and barbecue catering in addition to all the Museum’s normal attractions. Bring the family, bring your camera and bring your autograph books. We hope to see you there.

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Museum Development

The Museum car park has been enlarged and re-laid and audio guides provided with the assistance of LEADER – the European Agricultural Fund for Redevelopment.


Meteor Sets World Speed Record - History

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Description

The very first British jet engine-powered fighter to see operational service was the Gloster Meteor. Following the wartime Meteor Mk.Is and Mk.IIIs, the production line gave also the post war Mk.4 version with much better performance. On 7 November 1945, two Meteor Mk.3s rebuilt to a Mk.4 standard were used to attempt the World Speed Record. The RAF High Speed Flight Meteors serialled EE454 and EE455 were flown by RAF’s Group Captain Hugh Joseph Wilson, CBE, AFC and Two Bars and Gloster Chief Test Pilot Eric Stanley Greenwood. Wilson, flying the camouflaged EE454 was few more miles faster that Greenwood in (almost) all-yellow EE455, having raised the record to 975.68 kmh. Less than a year later, Gp Capt E M (Teddy) Donaldson in a Meteor serialled EE549 set up a new record of 991.33 kmh and in January 1947, the very same machine also raised the Paris-London speed record.

The kit comprises two styrene sprues and a clear injected canopy, a fret of photo-etched engine air intake meshes, adhesive masks for various style canopies (incl. the special high speed metal canopy with small transparent portholes) and a decal sheet for record breaking machines serialled EE454, EE455 and EE549. The latter is depicted in two various colour schemes (camouflaged and all-blue) and what may be most interesting, with two various styles of her outer wing panels as later during the career, she was seen fitted with a standard Mk.4 short span wing.

The very first British jet engine-powered fighter to see operational service was the Gloster Meteor. Following the wartime Meteor Mk.Is and Mk.IIIs, the production line gave also the post war Mk.4 version with much better performance. On 7 November 1945, two Meteor Mk.3s rebuilt to a Mk.4 standard were used to attempt the World Speed Record. The RAF High Speed Flight Meteors serialled EE454 and EE455 were flown by RAF’s Group Captain Hugh Joseph Wilson, CBE, AFC and Two Bars and Gloster Chief Test Pilot Eric Stanley Greenwood. Wilson, flying the camouflaged EE454 was few more miles faster that Greenwood in (almost) all-yellow EE455, having raised the record to 975.68 km/h. Less than a year later, Gp Capt E M (Teddy) Donaldson in a Meteor serialled EE549 set up a new record of 991.33 km/h and in January 1947, the very same machine also raised the Paris-London speed record.

The kit comprises two styrene sprues and a clear injected canopy, a fret of photo-etched engine air intake meshes, adhesive masks for various style canopies (incl. the special high speed metal canopy with small transparent portholes) and a decal sheet for record breaking machines serialled EE454, EE455 and EE549. The latter is depicted in two various colour schemes (camouflaged and all-blue) and what may be most interesting, with two various styles of her outer wing panels as later during the career, she was seen fitted with a standard Mk.4 short span wing.


15 Fastest Things In The Universe

Almost everybody likes speed. The thought of going faster than anyone else has inspired man: everything from countless drag racing movie scenes to the use of steroids in pursuit of the title of &ldquoWorld&rsquos Fastest Human&rdquo. I knew a few of the &ldquofastest things&rdquo below &ndash the fastest animal and bird &ndash but was surprised about several of the others. While researching info for a completely different project, I stumbled upon the M1-J10, the world&rsquos fastest tank. It was so surprising, I checked on some other &ldquothings that go fast&rdquo. This list is the result.

Usain St. Leo Bolt C.D (born 21 August 1986) is a Jamaican sprinter. Bolt holds the Olympic and world records for the 100 meters at 9.69 seconds, the 200 meters at 19.30 seconds and, along with his teammates, the 4𴠼 meters relay at 37.10 seconds, all set at the 2008 Summer Olympics. Bolt became the first man to win all three events at a single Olympics since Carl Lewis in 1984, and the first man in history to set world records in all three at a single Olympics. His name and achievements in sprinting have earned him the media nickname &ldquo&lsquoLightning&rsquo Bolt&rdquo. At the 2009 Berlin World Championships on Sunday 16 August, he won the 100m final in a new world record time of 9.58 seconds.

The Bugatti Veyron may no longer be the world&rsquos fastest car. Today &mdash following a number of teasers and leaks &mdash Barabus officially unveiled the TKR: a new 1005 horsepower supercar the automaker says is capable of doing zero to 98kph in 1.67 seconds. What&rsquos more, the car reportedly has a top speed of 270 mph &mdash nearly 20 more than the Veyron. Power comes from a 6.0 liter V8 twin-turbocharged with dual intercoolers.

The fastest land animal in the world, the cheetah is a marvel of evolution. Capable of running up to 70 miles per hour, the cheetah&rsquos slender, long-legged body is built for speed. Its spotted coat, small head and ears, and distinctive &ldquotear stripes&rdquo from the corner of the eyes down the sides of the nose make the cheetah highly recognizable among the large cats of Africa.

Roadrunner is a supercomputer built by IBM at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, USA. Currently the world&rsquos fastest computer, the US$133-million Roadrunner is designed for a peak performance of 1.7 petaflops (1 petaflop = over 10^15/1,000,000,000,000,000/ 1 quadrillion calculations per second!), achieving 1.026 on May 25, 2008, and to be the world&rsquos first TOP500 Linpack sustained 1.0 petaflops system. It is a one-of-a-kind supercomputer, built from off the shelf parts, with many novel design features.

Sailfish are two species of fishes in the genus Istiophorus, living in warmer sections of all the oceans of the world. They are blue to grey in color and have a characteristic erectile dorsal fin known as a sail, which often stretches the entire length of the back. Another notable characteristic is the elongated bill, resembling that of the swordfish and other marlins. Individuals have been clocked at speeds of up to 110 km/h (70 mph), which is the highest speed reliably reported in a fish. If this fish could travel on land, it can easily outrace a driver on a typical freeway. (Imagine the wreckage if this thing crashed&hellip*stab*)

Japan has a demonstration line in Yamanashi prefecture where test trains JR-Maglev MLX01 have reached 581 km/h (367 mph), slightly faster than any wheeled trains (the current TGV speed record is 574.8 km/h, 357.0 mph). These trains use superconducting magnets which allow for a larger gap, and repulsive-type electrodynamic suspension (EDS). In comparison Transrapid uses conventional electromagnets and attractive-type electromagnetic suspension (EMS). These &ldquoSuperconducting Maglev Shinkansen&rdquo, developed by the Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central) and Kawasaki Heavy Industries, are currently the fastest trains in the world, achieving a record speed of 581 km/h on December 2, 2003. Yamanashi Prefecture residents (and government officials) can sign up to ride this for free, and some 100,000 have done so already.

The Insano is the highest water slide in the world at 41 meters high, a record listed in the Guinness Book of Records. Its height is equivalent to that of a 14-story building. As a consequence of its height and slope, this water slide provides an extremely rapid descent &ndash taking between four and five seconds &ndash at a speed of 105 km/h (65mph). Because of these characteristics, the Insano is considered the most extreme of this type of equipment on the planet. At the end of the track, the Insano provides you with a relaxing dive into the swimming pool.

K-222, formerly K-162, was the only Papa ever constructed (&ldquoPapa&rdquo is the western name for the Soviet Union&rsquos Anchar submarine class). It was laid down December 28, 1963, and commissioned on December 31, 1969, at Severodvinsk. It was assigned to the Soviet Northern Fleet for the duration of its career. It was the world&rsquos fastest submarine, reaching a record speed of 44.7 knots on trials. However, that speed came at the price of high costs during construction, and both excessive noise and significant damage to hull features when used.

The North American X-15 rocket-powered aircraft was part of the X-series of experimental aircraft, initiated with the Bell X-1, that were made for the USAF, NASA, and the USN. The X-15 set speed and altitude records in the early 1960s, reaching the edge of outer space and returning with valuable data used in aircraft and spacecraft design. It currently holds the world record for the fastest speed ever reached by a manned aircraft. During the X-15 program, 13 of the flights (by eight pilots) met the USAF spaceflight criteria by exceeding the altitude of 50 miles (80.47 km. 264,000ft.), thus qualifying the pilots for astronaut status some pilots also qualified for NASA astronaut wings. Its fastest speed recorded is 4,519 mph (7,273 km/h) while manned by pilot Pete Knight.

Keep in mind that the maximum speed a rotor helicopter can reach, in theory, before spinning out of control is just over 250 miles per hour. Now that you know that, at an European air show on August 6, 1986 a Westland Lynx ZB500, that was slightly modified, reached a speed of 249.1 miles per hour or 400.8 km/h, making it the world&rsquos fastest helicopter.


A 66-Ton Meteorite

The farmer had discovered a 66-ton iron meteorite - the largest single meteorite ever found and the largest piece of iron ever found near Earth's surface. It is tabular in shape and about nine feet long, nine feet wide and about three feet thick. It was given the name "Hoba" because it was discovered on a farm named "Hoba West."

Hoba is thought to have fallen to Earth about 80,000 years ago. It is composed of about 84% iron, 16% nickel, and trace amounts of cobalt and other metals. An abundance of iron oxides in the soil around the meteorite suggests that it was much larger than 66 tons when it landed and has suffered significant losses from oxidation.

Additional Meteorite Information
[1] What Are Meteorites?


Watch the video: RAF Gloster Meteor attempts to set a new air speed record 1945


Comments:

  1. Iliana

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  2. Fitz Hugh

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  3. Zulushicage

    Of course. It was with me too. Let's discuss this issue. Here or at PM.

  4. Elmer

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